Indwelling pleural catheters for non-malignant effusions: a multicentre review of practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593777
Title:
Indwelling pleural catheters for non-malignant effusions: a multicentre review of practice
Authors:
Bhatnagar, R.; Reid, E. D.; Corcoran, J. P.; Bagenal, J. D.; Pope, Sandra; Clive, A. O.; Zahan-Evans, N.; Froeschle, Peter O.; West, D.; Rahman, N. M.; Chatterji, S.; Sivasothy, P. R.; Maskell, N. A.
Abstract:
Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are commonly used in the management of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). There is little data on their use in non-malignant conditions. All IPC insertions for non-malignant cases from five large UK centres were found using prospectively maintained databases. Data were collected on 57 IPC insertions. The commonest indications were hepatic hydrothorax (33%) and inflammatory pleuritis (26%). The mean weekly fluid output was 2.8 L (SD 2.52). 48/57 (84%) patients had no complications. Suspected pleural infection was documented in 2 (3.5%) cases. 33% (19/57) of patients underwent 'spontaneous' pleurodesis at a median time of 71 days. Patients with hepatic disease achieved pleurodesis significantly less often than those with non-hepatic disease (p=0.03). These data support the use of IPCs in select cases of non-malignant disease when maximal medical therapy has failed.
Citation:
Thorax. 2014 Oct;69(10):959-61.
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
Thorax
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593777
DOI:
10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204563
PubMed ID:
24343783
Additional Links:
http://thorax.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24343783
Note:
RD&E staff can access the full-text of this article by clicking on the 'Additional Link' above and logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.
Type:
Journal Article; Multicenter Study
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1468-3296
Appears in Collections:
Thoracic Surgery; 2014 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBhatnagar, R.en
dc.contributor.authorReid, E. D.en
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, J. P.en
dc.contributor.authorBagenal, J. D.en
dc.contributor.authorPope, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorClive, A. O.en
dc.contributor.authorZahan-Evans, N.en
dc.contributor.authorFroeschle, Peter O.en
dc.contributor.authorWest, D.en
dc.contributor.authorRahman, N. M.en
dc.contributor.authorChatterji, S.en
dc.contributor.authorSivasothy, P. R.en
dc.contributor.authorMaskell, N. A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:34:48Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:34:48Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationThorax. 2014 Oct;69(10):959-61.en
dc.identifier.issn1468-3296en
dc.identifier.pmid24343783en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/thoraxjnl-2013-204563en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/593777en
dc.description.abstractIndwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are commonly used in the management of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). There is little data on their use in non-malignant conditions. All IPC insertions for non-malignant cases from five large UK centres were found using prospectively maintained databases. Data were collected on 57 IPC insertions. The commonest indications were hepatic hydrothorax (33%) and inflammatory pleuritis (26%). The mean weekly fluid output was 2.8 L (SD 2.52). 48/57 (84%) patients had no complications. Suspected pleural infection was documented in 2 (3.5%) cases. 33% (19/57) of patients underwent 'spontaneous' pleurodesis at a median time of 71 days. Patients with hepatic disease achieved pleurodesis significantly less often than those with non-hepatic disease (p=0.03). These data support the use of IPCs in select cases of non-malignant disease when maximal medical therapy has failed.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://thorax.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24343783en
dc.titleIndwelling pleural catheters for non-malignant effusions: a multicentre review of practiceen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeMulticenter Studyen
dc.identifier.journalThoraxen
dc.description.noteRD&E staff can access the full-text of this article by clicking on the 'Additional Link' above and logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en

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