Physical illness in looked-after children: a cross-sectional study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593789
Title:
Physical illness in looked-after children: a cross-sectional study
Authors:
Martin, Alice; Ford, T.; Goodman, R.; Meltzer, H.; Logan, Stuart
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To compare the reported point prevalence of chronic physical illness among children looked after by local authorities with those living in their own homes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, using questionnaire data from a national survey. SETTING: The UK. PARTICIPANTS: Random samples of children aged 5-15 years. Children looked after were selected from Department of Health databases, stratified according to placement type. The child benefit register was the sampling frame for children in their own homes, weighted to match the child population demographic and compensate for response variability. MAIN OUTCOME: Carer-reported prevalence of 10 physical illnesses. RESULTS: Data were collected on 1253 looked-after children and 10 438 children in their own homes. There were lower rates of asthma, eczema and hay fever reported among looked-after children compared with children at home (ORs, adjusted for age, gender and ethnicity, were 0.63, 0.61 and 0.36, respectively). Epilepsy, cystic fibrosis and cerebral palsy were more commonly reported in looked-after children (adjusted ORs 4.13, 4.2 and 7.26, respectively). There was no difference in the proportions of children in the two groups reporting glue ear, diabetes mellitus, spina bifida or cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Looked-after children have an increased prevalence of some physical illnesses. The results also suggest that there may be significant unmet need, with health professionals and carers failing to identify other illnesses. The lower reported prevalence of atopic conditions may reflect a truly lower occurrence of such diseases in looked-after children; this requires further work to explore.
Citation:
Arch Dis Child. 2014 Feb;99(2):103-7.
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
Archives of disease in childhood
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593789
DOI:
10.1136/archdischild-2013-303993
PubMed ID:
23922058
Additional Links:
http://adc.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23922058
Note:
RD&E staff can access the full-text of this article by clicking on the 'Additional Link' above and logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.
Type:
Comparative Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1468-2044
Appears in Collections:
2014 RD&E publications; Paediatrics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Aliceen
dc.contributor.authorFord, T.en
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, R.en
dc.contributor.authorMeltzer, H.en
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Stuarten
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:34:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:34:56Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02-01en
dc.identifier.citationArch Dis Child. 2014 Feb;99(2):103-7.en
dc.identifier.issn1468-2044en
dc.identifier.pmid23922058en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/archdischild-2013-303993en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/593789en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To compare the reported point prevalence of chronic physical illness among children looked after by local authorities with those living in their own homes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, using questionnaire data from a national survey. SETTING: The UK. PARTICIPANTS: Random samples of children aged 5-15 years. Children looked after were selected from Department of Health databases, stratified according to placement type. The child benefit register was the sampling frame for children in their own homes, weighted to match the child population demographic and compensate for response variability. MAIN OUTCOME: Carer-reported prevalence of 10 physical illnesses. RESULTS: Data were collected on 1253 looked-after children and 10 438 children in their own homes. There were lower rates of asthma, eczema and hay fever reported among looked-after children compared with children at home (ORs, adjusted for age, gender and ethnicity, were 0.63, 0.61 and 0.36, respectively). Epilepsy, cystic fibrosis and cerebral palsy were more commonly reported in looked-after children (adjusted ORs 4.13, 4.2 and 7.26, respectively). There was no difference in the proportions of children in the two groups reporting glue ear, diabetes mellitus, spina bifida or cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Looked-after children have an increased prevalence of some physical illnesses. The results also suggest that there may be significant unmet need, with health professionals and carers failing to identify other illnesses. The lower reported prevalence of atopic conditions may reflect a truly lower occurrence of such diseases in looked-after children; this requires further work to explore.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://adc.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23922058en
dc.titlePhysical illness in looked-after children: a cross-sectional studyen
dc.typeComparative Studyen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalArchives of disease in childhooden
dc.description.noteRD&E staff can access the full-text of this article by clicking on the 'Additional Link' above and logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in RD&E Research Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.