Prevalence of vascular complications among patients with glucokinase mutations and prolonged, mild hyperglycemia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593887
Title:
Prevalence of vascular complications among patients with glucokinase mutations and prolonged, mild hyperglycemia
Authors:
Steele, A. M.; Shields, Beverley M; Wensley, K. J.; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian ( 0000-0002-7620-5526 ) ; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
IMPORTANCE: Glycemic targets in diabetes have been developed to minimize complication risk. Patients with heterozygous, inactivating glucokinase (GCK) mutations have mild fasting hyperglycemia from birth, resulting in an elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level that mimics recommended levels for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between chronic, mild hyperglycemia and complication prevalence and severity in patients with GCK mutations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study in the United Kingdom between August 2008 and December 2010. Assessment of microvascular and macrovascular complications in participants 35 years or older was conducted in 99 GCK mutation carriers (median age, 48.6 years), 91 nondiabetic, familial, nonmutation carriers (control) (median age, 52.2 years), and 83 individuals with young-onset type 2 diabetes (YT2D), diagnosed at age 45 years or younger (median age, 54.7 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Prevalence and severity of nephropathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, and cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Median HbA1c was 6.9% in patients with the GCK mutation, 5.8% in controls, and 7.8% in patients with YT2D. Patients with GCK had a low prevalence of clinically significant microvascular complications (1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]) that was not significantly different from controls (2% [95% CI, 0.3%-8%], P=.52) and lower than in patients with YT2D (36% [95% CI, 25%-47%], P<.001). Thirty percent of patients with GCK had retinopathy (95% CI, 21%-41%) compared with 14% of controls (95% CI, 7%-23%, P=.007) and 63% of patients with YT2D (95% CI, 51%-73%, P<.001). Neither patients with GCK nor controls required laser therapy for retinopathy compared with 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) of patients with YT2D (P<.001). Neither patients with GCK patients nor controls had proteinuria and microalbuminuria was rare (GCK, 1% [95% CI, 0.2%-6%]; controls, 2% [95% CI, 0.2%-8%]), whereas 10% (95% CI, 4%-19%) of YT2D patients had proteinuria (P<.001 vs GCK) and 21% (95% CI, 13%-32%) had microalbuminuria (P<.001). Neuropathy was rare in patients with GCK (2% [95% CI, 0.3%-8%]) and controls (95% CI, 0% [0%-4%]) but present in 29% (95% CI, 20%-50%) of YT2D patients (P<.001). Patients with GCK had a low prevalence of clinically significant macrovascular complications (4% [95% CI, 1%-10%]) that was not significantly different from controls (11% [95% CI, 5%-19%]; P=.09), and lower in prevalence than patients with YT2D (30% [95% CI, 21%-41%], P<.001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Despite a median duration of 48.6 years of hyperglycemia, patients with a GCK mutation had low prevalence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. These findings may provide insights into the risks associated with isolated, mild hyperglycemia.
Citation:
JAMA. 2014 Jan 15;311(3):279-86.
Publisher:
JAMA
Journal:
JAMA
Issue Date:
15-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593887
DOI:
10.1001/jama.2013.283980
PubMed ID:
24430320
Additional Links:
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jama.2013.283980
Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1538-3598
Appears in Collections:
2014 RD&E publications; Clinical Genetics (Peninsula Genetics); Molecular Genetics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSteele, A. M.en
dc.contributor.authorShields, Beverley Men
dc.contributor.authorWensley, K. J.en
dc.contributor.authorColclough, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorEllard, Sianen
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:36:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:36:21Zen
dc.date.issued2014-01-15en
dc.identifier.citationJAMA. 2014 Jan 15;311(3):279-86.en
dc.identifier.issn1538-3598en
dc.identifier.pmid24430320en
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.2013.283980en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/593887en
dc.description.abstractIMPORTANCE: Glycemic targets in diabetes have been developed to minimize complication risk. Patients with heterozygous, inactivating glucokinase (GCK) mutations have mild fasting hyperglycemia from birth, resulting in an elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level that mimics recommended levels for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between chronic, mild hyperglycemia and complication prevalence and severity in patients with GCK mutations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study in the United Kingdom between August 2008 and December 2010. Assessment of microvascular and macrovascular complications in participants 35 years or older was conducted in 99 GCK mutation carriers (median age, 48.6 years), 91 nondiabetic, familial, nonmutation carriers (control) (median age, 52.2 years), and 83 individuals with young-onset type 2 diabetes (YT2D), diagnosed at age 45 years or younger (median age, 54.7 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Prevalence and severity of nephropathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, and cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Median HbA1c was 6.9% in patients with the GCK mutation, 5.8% in controls, and 7.8% in patients with YT2D. Patients with GCK had a low prevalence of clinically significant microvascular complications (1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]) that was not significantly different from controls (2% [95% CI, 0.3%-8%], P=.52) and lower than in patients with YT2D (36% [95% CI, 25%-47%], P<.001). Thirty percent of patients with GCK had retinopathy (95% CI, 21%-41%) compared with 14% of controls (95% CI, 7%-23%, P=.007) and 63% of patients with YT2D (95% CI, 51%-73%, P<.001). Neither patients with GCK nor controls required laser therapy for retinopathy compared with 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) of patients with YT2D (P<.001). Neither patients with GCK patients nor controls had proteinuria and microalbuminuria was rare (GCK, 1% [95% CI, 0.2%-6%]; controls, 2% [95% CI, 0.2%-8%]), whereas 10% (95% CI, 4%-19%) of YT2D patients had proteinuria (P<.001 vs GCK) and 21% (95% CI, 13%-32%) had microalbuminuria (P<.001). Neuropathy was rare in patients with GCK (2% [95% CI, 0.3%-8%]) and controls (95% CI, 0% [0%-4%]) but present in 29% (95% CI, 20%-50%) of YT2D patients (P<.001). Patients with GCK had a low prevalence of clinically significant macrovascular complications (4% [95% CI, 1%-10%]) that was not significantly different from controls (11% [95% CI, 5%-19%]; P=.09), and lower in prevalence than patients with YT2D (30% [95% CI, 21%-41%], P<.001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Despite a median duration of 48.6 years of hyperglycemia, patients with a GCK mutation had low prevalence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. These findings may provide insights into the risks associated with isolated, mild hyperglycemia.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherJAMAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jama.2013.283980en
dc.titlePrevalence of vascular complications among patients with glucokinase mutations and prolonged, mild hyperglycemiaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalJAMAen

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