Genetic scores to stratify risk of developing multiple islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes: A prospective study in children.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620703
Title:
Genetic scores to stratify risk of developing multiple islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes: A prospective study in children.
Authors:
Bonifacio, E.; Beyerlein, A.; Hippich, M.; Winkler, C.; Vehik, K.; Weedon, M. N.; Laimighofer, M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Krumsiek, J.; Frohnert, B. I.; Steck, A. K.; Hagopian, W. A.; Krischer, J. P.; Lernmark, Å.; Rewers, M. J.; She, J-X; Toppari, J.; Akolkar, B.; Oram, R. A.; Rich, S. S.; Ziegler, A-G
Abstract:
Around 0.3% of newborns will develop autoimmunity to pancreatic beta cells in childhood and subsequently develop type 1 diabetes before adulthood. Primary prevention of type 1 diabetes will require early intervention in genetically at-risk infants. The objective of this study was to determine to what extent genetic scores (two previous genetic scores and a merged genetic score) can improve the prediction of type 1 diabetes.
Citation:
Genetic scores to stratify risk of developing multiple islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes: A prospective study in children. 2018, 15 (4):e1002548 PLoS Med.
Publisher:
PLoS
Journal:
PLoS medicine
Issue Date:
Apr-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620703
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pmed.1002548
PubMed ID:
29614081
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002548
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1549-1676
Appears in Collections:
Diabetes/Endocrine Services; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBonifacio, E.en
dc.contributor.authorBeyerlein, A.en
dc.contributor.authorHippich, M.en
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, C.en
dc.contributor.authorVehik, K.en
dc.contributor.authorWeedon, M. N.en
dc.contributor.authorLaimighofer, M.en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.contributor.authorKrumsiek, J.en
dc.contributor.authorFrohnert, B. I.en
dc.contributor.authorSteck, A. K.en
dc.contributor.authorHagopian, W. A.en
dc.contributor.authorKrischer, J. P.en
dc.contributor.authorLernmark, Å.en
dc.contributor.authorRewers, M. J.en
dc.contributor.authorShe, J-Xen
dc.contributor.authorToppari, J.en
dc.contributor.authorAkolkar, B.en
dc.contributor.authorOram, R. A.en
dc.contributor.authorRich, S. S.en
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, A-Gen
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-07T15:45:15Z-
dc.date.available2018-06-07T15:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-
dc.identifier.citationGenetic scores to stratify risk of developing multiple islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes: A prospective study in children. 2018, 15 (4):e1002548 PLoS Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1549-1676-
dc.identifier.pmid29614081-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.1002548-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620703-
dc.description.abstractAround 0.3% of newborns will develop autoimmunity to pancreatic beta cells in childhood and subsequently develop type 1 diabetes before adulthood. Primary prevention of type 1 diabetes will require early intervention in genetically at-risk infants. The objective of this study was to determine to what extent genetic scores (two previous genetic scores and a merged genetic score) can improve the prediction of type 1 diabetes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLoSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002548en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS medicine. : This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose.The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinology::Diabetesen
dc.titleGenetic scores to stratify risk of developing multiple islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes: A prospective study in children.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS medicineen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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