Communicating with disabled children when inpatients: barriers and facilitators identified by parents and professionals in a qualitative study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593815
Title:
Communicating with disabled children when inpatients: barriers and facilitators identified by parents and professionals in a qualitative study
Authors:
Sharkey, S.; Lloyd, C.; Tomlinson, Richard; Thomas, Eleanor; Martin, Alastair; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Communication is a fundamental part of health care, but can be more difficult with disabled children. Disabled children are more frequently admitted to hospital than other children. AIMS: To explore experiences of ward staff and families to identify barriers and facilitators to effective communication with disabled children whilst inpatients. DESIGN: This was an exploratory qualitative study. METHODS: We consulted 25 staff working on paediatric wards and 15 parents of disabled children recently admitted to those wards. We had difficulty in recruiting children and evaluating their experiences. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data supported by the Framework Approach was used to explore experiences and views about communication. Emerging themes were subsequently synthesised to identify barriers and facilitators to good communication. RESULTS: Barriers to communication included time, professionals not prioritising communication in their role and poor information sharing between parents and professionals. Facilitators included professionals building rapport with a child, good relationships between professionals and parents, professionals having a family-centred approach, and the use of communication aids. CONCLUSIONS: Communication with disabled children on the ward was perceived as less than optimal. Parents are instrumental in the communication between their children and professionals. Although aware of the importance of communication with disabled children, staff perceived time pressures and lack of priority given to communicating directly with the child as major barriers.
Citation:
Health Expect. 2014 Aug 24.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy
Issue Date:
24-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/593815
DOI:
10.1111/hex.12254
PubMed ID:
25156078
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hex.12254
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
Eng
ISSN:
1369-7625
Appears in Collections:
Anaesthetics; 2014 RD&E publications; Paediatrics; Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSharkey, S.en
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, C.en
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Eleanoren
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Alastairen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Stuarten
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Christopheren
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:35:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:35:17Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-24en
dc.identifier.citationHealth Expect. 2014 Aug 24.en
dc.identifier.issn1369-7625en
dc.identifier.pmid25156078en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/hex.12254en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/593815en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Communication is a fundamental part of health care, but can be more difficult with disabled children. Disabled children are more frequently admitted to hospital than other children. AIMS: To explore experiences of ward staff and families to identify barriers and facilitators to effective communication with disabled children whilst inpatients. DESIGN: This was an exploratory qualitative study. METHODS: We consulted 25 staff working on paediatric wards and 15 parents of disabled children recently admitted to those wards. We had difficulty in recruiting children and evaluating their experiences. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data supported by the Framework Approach was used to explore experiences and views about communication. Emerging themes were subsequently synthesised to identify barriers and facilitators to good communication. RESULTS: Barriers to communication included time, professionals not prioritising communication in their role and poor information sharing between parents and professionals. Facilitators included professionals building rapport with a child, good relationships between professionals and parents, professionals having a family-centred approach, and the use of communication aids. CONCLUSIONS: Communication with disabled children on the ward was perceived as less than optimal. Parents are instrumental in the communication between their children and professionals. Although aware of the importance of communication with disabled children, staff perceived time pressures and lack of priority given to communicating directly with the child as major barriers.en
dc.language.isoEngen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hex.12254en
dc.titleCommunicating with disabled children when inpatients: barriers and facilitators identified by parents and professionals in a qualitative studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalHealth expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policyen

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