Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/594005
Title:
Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging
Authors:
Kosy, Jonathan D.; Mandalia, Vipul; Anaspure, Rahul
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. RESULTS: The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 +/- 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 +/- 0.57 mm. CONCLUSIONS: The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification.
Citation:
Skeletal Radiol. 2015 Nov;44(11):1647-53.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Skeletal radiology
Issue Date:
Nov-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/594005
DOI:
10.1007/s00256-015-2218-1
PubMed ID:
26205762
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-015-2218-1
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1432-2161
Appears in Collections:
2015 RD&E publications; General Trauma & Orthopaedics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKosy, Jonathan D.en
dc.contributor.authorMandalia, Vipulen
dc.contributor.authorAnaspure, Rahulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:38:30Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:38:30Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11en
dc.identifier.citationSkeletal Radiol. 2015 Nov;44(11):1647-53.en
dc.identifier.issn1432-2161en
dc.identifier.pmid26205762en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00256-015-2218-1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/594005en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. RESULTS: The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 +/- 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 +/- 0.57 mm. CONCLUSIONS: The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-015-2218-1en
dc.titleCharacterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imagingen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalSkeletal radiologyen

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