Puberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/594018
Title:
Puberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank study
Authors:
Day, F. R.; Elks, C. E.; Murray, Anna; Ong, K. K.; Perry, J. R.
Abstract:
Early puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~ 0.2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P < 7.48 x 10(-5)). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.
Citation:
Sci Rep. 2015 Jun 18;5:11208.
Publisher:
Nature
Journal:
Scientific reports
Issue Date:
18-Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/594018
DOI:
10.1038/srep11208
PubMed ID:
26084728
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/26084728/
Note:
This article is available via Open Access. Please click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text.
Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
eng
ISSN:
2045-2322
Appears in Collections:
2015 RD&E publications; Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDay, F. R.en
dc.contributor.authorElks, C. E.en
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorOng, K. K.en
dc.contributor.authorPerry, J. R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:38:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:38:39Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-18en
dc.identifier.citationSci Rep. 2015 Jun 18;5:11208.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.pmid26084728en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep11208en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/594018en
dc.description.abstractEarly puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~ 0.2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P < 7.48 x 10(-5)). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherNatureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/26084728/en
dc.titlePuberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen
dc.description.noteThis article is available via Open Access. Please click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text.en

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