Management of common infections in pregnancy

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/603998
Title:
Management of common infections in pregnancy
Authors:
Parker, Hazel; Auckland, Cressida
Abstract:
Pregnant women are peculiarly vulnerable to infections – the mechanism for this is multi-factorial and includes immune tolerance to the fetus (and placenta) itself, and maternal physiological changes, such as urinary stasis and reduced lung reserve. Some infections are more severe in pregnancy, such as malaria, influenza, hepatitis E and measles. Other infections place the fetus and/or newborn infant at particular risk, such as herpes simplex virus, varicella, listeria and toxoplasmosis. This unique status is recognised by the NHS in the many infection prevention initiatives available to pregnant women: free NHS dental care, the infectious diseases in pregnancy screening programme (for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and syphilis infection), the vaccination programme, and in the general advice provided by midwives and their healthcare teams. In this article, we aim to cover issues that we, as pharmacists and microbiologists, are commonly asked about regarding pregnant women, including: antibiotic safety, management of common genitourinary infections, immunisation, rash exposures and rashes.
Citation:
Management of common infections in pregnancy 2016, 9 (3):161 InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practice
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practice
Issue Date:
9-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/603998
DOI:
10.1177/1755738015622492
Additional Links:
http://ino.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/1755738015622492
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1755-7380; 1755-7399
Appears in Collections:
2016 RD&E publications; Pharmacy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorParker, Hazelen
dc.contributor.authorAuckland, Cressidaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T11:11:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-30T11:11:56Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-09en
dc.identifier.citationManagement of common infections in pregnancy 2016, 9 (3):161 InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practiceen
dc.identifier.issn1755-7380en
dc.identifier.issn1755-7399en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1755738015622492en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/603998en
dc.description.abstractPregnant women are peculiarly vulnerable to infections – the mechanism for this is multi-factorial and includes immune tolerance to the fetus (and placenta) itself, and maternal physiological changes, such as urinary stasis and reduced lung reserve. Some infections are more severe in pregnancy, such as malaria, influenza, hepatitis E and measles. Other infections place the fetus and/or newborn infant at particular risk, such as herpes simplex virus, varicella, listeria and toxoplasmosis. This unique status is recognised by the NHS in the many infection prevention initiatives available to pregnant women: free NHS dental care, the infectious diseases in pregnancy screening programme (for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and syphilis infection), the vaccination programme, and in the general advice provided by midwives and their healthcare teams. In this article, we aim to cover issues that we, as pharmacists and microbiologists, are commonly asked about regarding pregnant women, including: antibiotic safety, management of common genitourinary infections, immunisation, rash exposures and rashes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ino.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/1755738015622492en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practiceen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Gynaecologyen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Obstetrics. Midwiferyen
dc.titleManagement of common infections in pregnancyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalInnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practiceen
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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