Exercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/608221
Title:
Exercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise.
Authors:
Stevens, D.; Oades, Patrick ( 0000-0001-5265-6923 ) ; Armstrong, N.; Williams, Craig A.
Abstract:
Muscle metabolism is increased following exercise in healthy individuals, affecting exercise metabolism during subsequent physical work. We hypothesized that following heavy-intensity exercise (HIE), disease factors in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) would further exacerbate exercise metabolism and perceived exertion during subsequent exercise. Nineteen children with CF (age, 13.4 ± 3.1 years; 10 female) and 19 healthy controls (age, 13.8 ± 3.5 years; 10 female) performed 10 bouts of HIE interspersed with 1 min of recovery between each bout. Three minutes later participants completed a 10-min moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) test (test 1). The MIE test was subsequently repeated 1 h (test 2) and 24 h (test 3) later. Each MIE test was identical and participants exercised at individualized work rates, calibrated by an initial graded maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, while metabolic and perceived exertion measurements were taken. Following HIE, mixed-model ANOVAs showed a significant difference in oxygen uptake (VO₂) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) between the 2 groups across the MIE tests (p < 0.01). In controls, VO₂ (L·min⁻¹) and RPE decreased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01) and test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.05). However, in children with CF, VO₂ (L·min⁻¹) increased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01), while RPE did not differ, both VO₂ and RPE decreased significantly from test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, following HIE the metabolic and perceptual responses to MIE in both groups decreased 24 h later during test 3. These data show that children with mild-to-moderate CF have the capability to perform HIE and 24 h allows sufficient time for recovery.
Citation:
Exercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise. 2011, 36 (6):920-7 Appl Physiol Nutr Metab
Publisher:
NRC Research Press
Journal:
Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolisme
Issue Date:
Dec-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/608221
DOI:
10.1139/h11-117
PubMed ID:
22087846
Additional Links:
http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/h11-117?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed
Type:
Journal Article; Controlled Clinical Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
en
ISSN:
1715-5312
Appears in Collections:
pre-2014 RD&E publications; Paediatrics; Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStevens, D.en
dc.contributor.authorOades, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, N.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Craig A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T10:58:52Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T10:58:52Zen
dc.date.issued2011-12en
dc.identifier.citationExercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise. 2011, 36 (6):920-7 Appl Physiol Nutr Metaben
dc.identifier.issn1715-5312en
dc.identifier.pmid22087846en
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/h11-117en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/608221en
dc.description.abstractMuscle metabolism is increased following exercise in healthy individuals, affecting exercise metabolism during subsequent physical work. We hypothesized that following heavy-intensity exercise (HIE), disease factors in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) would further exacerbate exercise metabolism and perceived exertion during subsequent exercise. Nineteen children with CF (age, 13.4 ± 3.1 years; 10 female) and 19 healthy controls (age, 13.8 ± 3.5 years; 10 female) performed 10 bouts of HIE interspersed with 1 min of recovery between each bout. Three minutes later participants completed a 10-min moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) test (test 1). The MIE test was subsequently repeated 1 h (test 2) and 24 h (test 3) later. Each MIE test was identical and participants exercised at individualized work rates, calibrated by an initial graded maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, while metabolic and perceived exertion measurements were taken. Following HIE, mixed-model ANOVAs showed a significant difference in oxygen uptake (VO₂) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) between the 2 groups across the MIE tests (p < 0.01). In controls, VO₂ (L·min⁻¹) and RPE decreased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01) and test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.05). However, in children with CF, VO₂ (L·min⁻¹) increased significantly from test 1 to test 2 (p < 0.01), while RPE did not differ, both VO₂ and RPE decreased significantly from test 2 to test 3 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, following HIE the metabolic and perceptual responses to MIE in both groups decreased 24 h later during test 3. These data show that children with mild-to-moderate CF have the capability to perform HIE and 24 h allows sufficient time for recovery.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNRC Research Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/h11-117?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmeden
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolismeen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Paediatricsen
dc.titleExercise metabolism during moderate-intensity exercise in children with cystic fibrosis following heavy-intensity exercise.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeControlled Clinical Trialen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalApplied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolismeen
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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