Standing up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/608791
Title:
Standing up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis.
Authors:
Freeman, J A; Hendrie, W; Creanor, S; Jarrett, Louise; Barton, A; Green, C; Marsden, J; Rogers, E; Zajicek, J
Abstract:
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable, unpredictable but typically progressive neurological condition. It is the most common cause of neurological disability in young adults. Within 15 years of diagnosis, approximately 50 % of affected people are unable to walk unaided, and over time an estimated 25 % depend on a wheelchair. Typically, people with such limited mobility are excluded from clinical trials. Severely impaired people with MS spend much of their day sitting, often with limited ability to change position. In response, secondary complications can occur including: muscle wasting, pain, reduced skin integrity, spasms, limb stiffness, constipation, and associated psychosocial problems such as depression and lowered self-esteem. Effective self-management strategies, which can be implemented relatively easily and cheaply within people's homes, are needed to improve or maintain mobility and reduce sedentary behaviour. However this is challenging, particularly in the latter stages of disease. Regular supported standing using standing frames is one potential option.
Citation:
Standing up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis. 2016, 16 (1):62 BMC Neurol
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
BMC neurology
Issue Date:
5-May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/608791
DOI:
10.1186/s12883-016-0581-8
PubMed ID:
27149954
Additional Links:
http://bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12883-016-0581-8
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1471-2377
Sponsors:
Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust
Appears in Collections:
2016 RD&E publications; Mardon Neuro-Rehabilitation Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, J Aen
dc.contributor.authorHendrie, Wen
dc.contributor.authorCreanor, Sen
dc.contributor.authorJarrett, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMarsden, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Een
dc.contributor.authorZajicek, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-10T12:46:57Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-10T12:46:57Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05-05en
dc.identifier.citationStanding up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis. 2016, 16 (1):62 BMC Neurolen
dc.identifier.issn1471-2377en
dc.identifier.pmid27149954en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12883-016-0581-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/608791en
dc.description.abstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable, unpredictable but typically progressive neurological condition. It is the most common cause of neurological disability in young adults. Within 15 years of diagnosis, approximately 50 % of affected people are unable to walk unaided, and over time an estimated 25 % depend on a wheelchair. Typically, people with such limited mobility are excluded from clinical trials. Severely impaired people with MS spend much of their day sitting, often with limited ability to change position. In response, secondary complications can occur including: muscle wasting, pain, reduced skin integrity, spasms, limb stiffness, constipation, and associated psychosocial problems such as depression and lowered self-esteem. Effective self-management strategies, which can be implemented relatively easily and cheaply within people's homes, are needed to improve or maintain mobility and reduce sedentary behaviour. However this is challenging, particularly in the latter stages of disease. Regular supported standing using standing frames is one potential option.en
dc.description.sponsorshipPlymouth Hospitals NHS Trusten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12883-016-0581-8en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC Neurology. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Neurologyen
dc.titleStanding up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalBMC neurologyen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.description.fundingNIHR Research for Patient Benefit Program (PB-PG-1013-32047)en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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