Can social media reduce discrimination and ignorance towards patients with long term conditions? A chronic kidney disease example in the UK and more widely

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/609050
Title:
Can social media reduce discrimination and ignorance towards patients with long term conditions? A chronic kidney disease example in the UK and more widely
Authors:
Muhammad, Shahid N. ( 0000-0001-9793-8692 ) ; Zahra, A. J.; Leicester, H. J.; Davis, H.
Abstract:
Long Term Conditions (LTCs) are increasing in prevalence and cost in Western healthcare. Patients with such conditions are often classed as “disabled”, because of impacts of self-care on “activities of daily life” or secondary consequences of conditions (impairments) affecting factors such as mobility, concentration and communications. Disability needs are often ignored in the design of services and treatment of individuals. It manifests as services which some find difficult to use and lack of personal respect (discrimination) often based on lack of understanding by the healthcare profession itself (ignorance). This paper explores how Social Media (SM), an example “Assistive Technology” in an increasingly digital age, might help. The focus is Chronic Kidney Disease with two, specific illustrations in the UK beginning to spread worldwide. Support mechanisms now emerging may go well beyond healthcare, and even beyond kidney problems. They may also find additional assistance via the new, English Accessible Information Standard.
Citation:
Can social media reduce discrimination and ignorance towards patients with long term conditions? A chronic kidney disease example in the UK and more widely. Patient Experience Journal Vol.3(1), pp35-41, 2016.
Publisher:
Patient Experience Journal
Journal:
Patient Experience Journal
Issue Date:
May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/609050
Additional Links:
http://pxjournal.org/journal/vol3/iss1/6
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2372-0247
Appears in Collections:
Exeter Kidney Unit (Renal); 2016 RD&E publications; Renal Patient Support Group (RPSG)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMuhammad, Shahid N.en
dc.contributor.authorZahra, A. J.en
dc.contributor.authorLeicester, H. J.en
dc.contributor.authorDavis, H.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-11T12:51:24Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-11T12:51:24Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.citationCan social media reduce discrimination and ignorance towards patients with long term conditions? A chronic kidney disease example in the UK and more widely. Patient Experience Journal Vol.3(1), pp35-41, 2016.en
dc.identifier.issn2372-0247en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/609050en
dc.description.abstractLong Term Conditions (LTCs) are increasing in prevalence and cost in Western healthcare. Patients with such conditions are often classed as “disabled”, because of impacts of self-care on “activities of daily life” or secondary consequences of conditions (impairments) affecting factors such as mobility, concentration and communications. Disability needs are often ignored in the design of services and treatment of individuals. It manifests as services which some find difficult to use and lack of personal respect (discrimination) often based on lack of understanding by the healthcare profession itself (ignorance). This paper explores how Social Media (SM), an example “Assistive Technology” in an increasingly digital age, might help. The focus is Chronic Kidney Disease with two, specific illustrations in the UK beginning to spread worldwide. Support mechanisms now emerging may go well beyond healthcare, and even beyond kidney problems. They may also find additional assistance via the new, English Accessible Information Standard.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPatient Experience Journalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pxjournal.org/journal/vol3/iss1/6en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to the Patient Experience Journal. This Article is brought to you for free and open access by Patient Experience Journal. It has been accepted for inclusion in Patient Experience Journal by an authorized administrator of Patient Experience Journal.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Practice of medicineen
dc.titleCan social media reduce discrimination and ignorance towards patients with long term conditions? A chronic kidney disease example in the UK and more widelyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalPatient Experience Journalen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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