Urine C-peptide creatinine ratio can be used to assess insulin resistance and insulin production in people without diabetes: an observational study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/609609
Title:
Urine C-peptide creatinine ratio can be used to assess insulin resistance and insulin production in people without diabetes: an observational study.
Authors:
Oram, Richard A.; Rawlingson, Andrew; Shields, Beverley M; Bingham, Coralie; Besser, R.; McDonald, Timothy J. ( 0000-0003-3559-6660 ) ; Knight, Bridget A.; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
The current assessment of insulin resistance (IR) in epidemiology studies relies on the blood measurement of C-peptide or insulin. A urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) can be posted from home unaided. It is validated against serum measures of the insulin in people with diabetes. We tested whether UCPCR could be a surrogate measure of IR by examining the correlation of UCPCR with serum insulin, C-peptide and HOMA2 (Homeostasis Model Assessment 2)-IR in participants without diabetes and with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Citation:
Urine C-peptide creatinine ratio can be used to assess insulin resistance and insulin production in people without diabetes: an observational study. 2013, 3 (12):e003193 BMJ Open
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
BMJ open
Issue Date:
18-Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/609609
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003193
PubMed ID:
24353253
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/12/e003193.long
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text from the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article; Observational Study
Language:
en
ISSN:
2044-6055
Appears in Collections:
pre-2014 RD&E publications; Exeter Kidney Unit (Renal); Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Exeter Clinical Laboratory International (Blood Sciences, Genetics, Cellular Pathology & Microbiology); Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOram, Richard A.en
dc.contributor.authorRawlingson, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorShields, Beverley Men
dc.contributor.authorBingham, Coralieen
dc.contributor.authorBesser, R.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Bridget A.en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-18T15:23:12Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-18T15:23:12Zen
dc.date.issued2013-12-18en
dc.identifier.citationUrine C-peptide creatinine ratio can be used to assess insulin resistance and insulin production in people without diabetes: an observational study. 2013, 3 (12):e003193 BMJ Openen
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en
dc.identifier.pmid24353253en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003193en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/609609en
dc.description.abstractThe current assessment of insulin resistance (IR) in epidemiology studies relies on the blood measurement of C-peptide or insulin. A urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) can be posted from home unaided. It is validated against serum measures of the insulin in people with diabetes. We tested whether UCPCR could be a surrogate measure of IR by examining the correlation of UCPCR with serum insulin, C-peptide and HOMA2 (Homeostasis Model Assessment 2)-IR in participants without diabetes and with chronic kidney disease (CKD).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/12/e003193.longen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ openen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinologyen
dc.titleUrine C-peptide creatinine ratio can be used to assess insulin resistance and insulin production in people without diabetes: an observational study.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeObservational Studyen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ openen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text from the publisher's site.en
dc.description.funding11/0004171/Diabetes UK/United Kingdomen
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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