Can I treat this pregnant patient with botulinum toxin?

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/610853
Title:
Can I treat this pregnant patient with botulinum toxin?
Authors:
Pearce, Catharine
Abstract:
Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is used extensively in the neurological setting, most commonly for the management of dystonia and spasticity. It is inevitable that female patients who derive a significant benefit from botulinum toxin treatment may inadvertently be injected in as-yet undiagnosed pregnancy or may be planning to become pregnant. Following an examination of the evidence for the safety of botulinum toxin in pregnancy, physicians and patients should be reassured as to the absence of evidence of harm in case reports of botulism and accidental or intentional botulinum toxin injection and the improbability of crossing the placenta. Consequently, judgment should be made that acknowledges that when botulinum toxin treatment is to continue through pregnancy it should be because this will represent the lesser harm in view of the severity of the mother’s symptoms and the physical and psychological harm caused by withholding treatment. It is also normally appropriate to reassure patients inadvertently injected.
Citation:
Can I treat this pregnant patient with botulinum toxin? 2014, 14 (1):32-3 Pract Neurol
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
Practical neurology
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/610853
DOI:
10.1136/practneurol-2013-000621
PubMed ID:
24390703
Additional Links:
http://pn.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24390703
Note:
This article is available to RD&E staff via NHS OpenAthens login. Click on the 'Additional Link' above and log in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1474-7766
Appears in Collections:
Neurology; 2014 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Catharineen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-27T09:30:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-27T09:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014-02-
dc.identifier.citationCan I treat this pregnant patient with botulinum toxin? 2014, 14 (1):32-3 Pract Neurolen
dc.identifier.issn1474-7766-
dc.identifier.pmid24390703-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/practneurol-2013-000621-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/610853-
dc.description.abstractBotulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is used extensively in the neurological setting, most commonly for the management of dystonia and spasticity. It is inevitable that female patients who derive a significant benefit from botulinum toxin treatment may inadvertently be injected in as-yet undiagnosed pregnancy or may be planning to become pregnant. Following an examination of the evidence for the safety of botulinum toxin in pregnancy, physicians and patients should be reassured as to the absence of evidence of harm in case reports of botulism and accidental or intentional botulinum toxin injection and the improbability of crossing the placenta. Consequently, judgment should be made that acknowledges that when botulinum toxin treatment is to continue through pregnancy it should be because this will represent the lesser harm in view of the severity of the mother’s symptoms and the physical and psychological harm caused by withholding treatment. It is also normally appropriate to reassure patients inadvertently injected.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pn.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24390703en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Practical Neurology. Accepted manuscript - final published version available via the DOI link above. Copyright of BMJ.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Neurologyen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Obstetrics. Midwiferyen
dc.titleCan I treat this pregnant patient with botulinum toxin?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalPractical neurologyen
dc.description.noteThis article is available to RD&E staff via NHS OpenAthens login. Click on the 'Additional Link' above and log in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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