Reactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/615362
Title:
Reactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation.
Authors:
Aizawa, Kunihiko; Elyas, Salim; Adingupu, D. D.; Casanova, Francesco; Gooding, Kim M.; Strain, David; Shore, Angela ( 0000-0003-3039-308x ) ; Gates, Phillip E.
Abstract:
Previous studies have reported a vasoconstrictor response in the radial artery during a cuff-induced low-flow condition, but a similar low-flow condition in the brachial artery results in nonuniform reactivity. This variable reactivity to low-flow influences the subsequent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) response following cuff-release. However, it is uncertain whether reactivity to low-flow is important in data interpretation in clinical populations and older adults. This study aimed to determine the influence of reactivity to low-flow on the magnitude of brachial artery FMD response in middle-aged and older individuals with diverse cardiovascular risk profiles. Data were analyzed from 165 individuals, divided into increased cardiovascular risk (CVR: n = 115, 85M, 67.0 ± 8.8 years) and healthy control (CTRL: n = 50, 30M, 63.2 ± 7.2 years) groups. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity data obtained from Doppler ultrasound were used to calculate FMD, reactivity to low-flow and estimated shear rate (SR) using semiautomated edge-detection software. There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and FMD in overall (r = 0.261), CTRL (r = 0.410) and CVR (r = 0.189, all P < 0.05) groups. Multivariate regression analysis found that reactivity to low-flow, peak SR, and baseline diameter independently contributed to FMD along with sex, the presence of diabetes, and smoking (total R(2) = 0.450). There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and the subsequent FMD response in the overall dataset, and reactivity to low-flow independently contributed to FMD These findings suggest that reactivity to low-flow plays a key role in the subsequent brachial artery FMD response and is important in the interpretation of FMD data.
Citation:
Reactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation. 2016, 4 (12): Physiol Rep
Publisher:
American Physiological Society
Journal:
Physiological reports
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/615362
DOI:
10.14814/phy2.12808
PubMed ID:
27335431
Additional Links:
http://physreports.physiology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=27335431
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2051-817X
Appears in Collections:
Stroke; Healthcare for Older People; Cardiology; Honorary contracts publications; 2016 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAizawa, Kunihikoen
dc.contributor.authorElyas, Salimen
dc.contributor.authorAdingupu, D. D.en
dc.contributor.authorCasanova, Francescoen
dc.contributor.authorGooding, Kim M.en
dc.contributor.authorStrain, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorShore, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorGates, Phillip E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-01T11:34:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-01T11:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-
dc.identifier.citationReactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation. 2016, 4 (12): Physiol Repen
dc.identifier.issn2051-817X-
dc.identifier.pmid27335431-
dc.identifier.doi10.14814/phy2.12808-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/615362-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have reported a vasoconstrictor response in the radial artery during a cuff-induced low-flow condition, but a similar low-flow condition in the brachial artery results in nonuniform reactivity. This variable reactivity to low-flow influences the subsequent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) response following cuff-release. However, it is uncertain whether reactivity to low-flow is important in data interpretation in clinical populations and older adults. This study aimed to determine the influence of reactivity to low-flow on the magnitude of brachial artery FMD response in middle-aged and older individuals with diverse cardiovascular risk profiles. Data were analyzed from 165 individuals, divided into increased cardiovascular risk (CVR: n = 115, 85M, 67.0 ± 8.8 years) and healthy control (CTRL: n = 50, 30M, 63.2 ± 7.2 years) groups. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity data obtained from Doppler ultrasound were used to calculate FMD, reactivity to low-flow and estimated shear rate (SR) using semiautomated edge-detection software. There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and FMD in overall (r = 0.261), CTRL (r = 0.410) and CVR (r = 0.189, all P < 0.05) groups. Multivariate regression analysis found that reactivity to low-flow, peak SR, and baseline diameter independently contributed to FMD along with sex, the presence of diabetes, and smoking (total R(2) = 0.450). There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and the subsequent FMD response in the overall dataset, and reactivity to low-flow independently contributed to FMD These findings suggest that reactivity to low-flow plays a key role in the subsequent brachial artery FMD response and is important in the interpretation of FMD data.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://physreports.physiology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=27335431en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Physiological Reports. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Cardiologyen
dc.titleReactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalPhysiological reportsen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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