The results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/615801
Title:
The results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties.
Authors:
Wilson, Matthew J.; Whitehouse, S. L.; Howell, Jonathan R.; Hubble, Matthew J.; Timperley, Andrew J.; Gie, G. A.
Abstract:
Between 1995 and 2003, 129 cemented primary THAs were performed using full acetabular impaction grafting to reconstruct acetabular deficiencies. These were classified as cavitary in 74 and segmental in 55 hips. Eighty-one patients were reviewed at mean 9.1 (6.2-14.3) years post-operatively. There were seven acetabular component revisions due to aseptic loosening, and a further 11 cases that had migrated >5mm or tilted >5° on radiological review - ten of which reported no symptoms. Kaplan-Meier analysis of revisions for aseptic loosening demonstrates 100% survival at nine years for cavitary defects compared to 82.6% for segmental defects. Our results suggest that the medium-term survival of this technique is excellent when used for purely cavitary defects but less predictable when used with large rim meshes in segmental defects.
Citation:
The results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties. 2013, 28 (8):1394-400 J Arthroplasty
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
The Journal of arthroplasty
Issue Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/615801
DOI:
10.1016/j.arth.2012.09.019
PubMed ID:
23523217
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883540313000533
Note:
RD&E staff can access the full-text of this article via OpenAccess. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text and log in with NHS OpenAthens if propted.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1532-8406
Appears in Collections:
General Trauma & Orthopaedics; Exeter Hip Unit; pre-2014 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Matthew J.en
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, S. L.en
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Jonathan R.en
dc.contributor.authorHubble, Matthew J.en
dc.contributor.authorTimperley, Andrew J.en
dc.contributor.authorGie, G. A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-08T08:26:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-08T08:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013-09-
dc.identifier.citationThe results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties. 2013, 28 (8):1394-400 J Arthroplastyen
dc.identifier.issn1532-8406-
dc.identifier.pmid23523217-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.arth.2012.09.019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/615801-
dc.description.abstractBetween 1995 and 2003, 129 cemented primary THAs were performed using full acetabular impaction grafting to reconstruct acetabular deficiencies. These were classified as cavitary in 74 and segmental in 55 hips. Eighty-one patients were reviewed at mean 9.1 (6.2-14.3) years post-operatively. There were seven acetabular component revisions due to aseptic loosening, and a further 11 cases that had migrated >5mm or tilted >5° on radiological review - ten of which reported no symptoms. Kaplan-Meier analysis of revisions for aseptic loosening demonstrates 100% survival at nine years for cavitary defects compared to 82.6% for segmental defects. Our results suggest that the medium-term survival of this technique is excellent when used for purely cavitary defects but less predictable when used with large rim meshes in segmental defects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883540313000533en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of arthroplastyen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Orthopaedicsen
dc.titleThe results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of arthroplastyen
dc.description.noteRD&E staff can access the full-text of this article via OpenAccess. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text and log in with NHS OpenAthens if propted.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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