The majority of patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes are insulin microsecretors and have functioning beta cells.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/618027
Title:
The majority of patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes are insulin microsecretors and have functioning beta cells.
Authors:
Oram, Richard A.; Jones, Angus G.; Besser, R.; Knight, Bridget A.; Shields, Beverley M.; Brown, Richard J.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McDonald, Timothy J. ( 0000-0003-3559-6660 )
Abstract:
Classically, type 1 diabetes is thought to proceed to absolute insulin deficiency. Recently developed ultrasensitive assays capable of detecting C-peptide under 5 pmol/l now allow very low levels of C-peptide to be detected in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. It is not known whether this low-level endogenous insulin secretion responds to physiological stimuli. We aimed to assess how commonly low-level detectable C-peptide occurs in long-duration type 1 diabetes and whether it responds to a meal stimulus.
Citation:
The majority of patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes are insulin microsecretors and have functioning beta cells. 2014, 57 (1):187-91 Diabetologia
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Diabetologia
Issue Date:
Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/618027
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-013-3067-x
PubMed ID:
24121625
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-013-3067-x
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
en
ISSN:
1432-0428
Appears in Collections:
2014 RD&E publications; Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Exeter Clinical Laboratory International (Blood Sciences, Genetics, Cellular Pathology & Microbiology); Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOram, Richard A.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Angus G.en
dc.contributor.authorBesser, R.en
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Bridget A.en
dc.contributor.authorShields, Beverley M.en
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Timothy J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-08T11:14:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-08T11:14:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-
dc.identifier.citationThe majority of patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes are insulin microsecretors and have functioning beta cells. 2014, 57 (1):187-91 Diabetologiaen
dc.identifier.issn1432-0428-
dc.identifier.pmid24121625-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00125-013-3067-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/618027-
dc.description.abstractClassically, type 1 diabetes is thought to proceed to absolute insulin deficiency. Recently developed ultrasensitive assays capable of detecting C-peptide under 5 pmol/l now allow very low levels of C-peptide to be detected in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. It is not known whether this low-level endogenous insulin secretion responds to physiological stimuli. We aimed to assess how commonly low-level detectable C-peptide occurs in long-duration type 1 diabetes and whether it responds to a meal stimulus.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-013-3067-xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Diabetologiaen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinology::Diabetesen
dc.titleThe majority of patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes are insulin microsecretors and have functioning beta cells.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalDiabetologiaen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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