Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/618114
Title:
Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology
Authors:
Locke, A. E. [et al]; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.
Citation:
Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology. 2015 Nature. 518(7538):197-206
Publisher:
Nature
Journal:
Nature
Issue Date:
Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/618114
DOI:
10.1038/nature14177
PubMed ID:
25673413
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4382211
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/25673413/
Note:
This article is freely available via PubMed Central. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text.
Type:
Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
2015 RD&E publications; Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLocke, A. E. [et al]en
dc.contributor.authorFrayling, Timothy M.en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-09T12:05:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-09T12:05:07Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-
dc.identifier.citationGenetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology. 2015 Nature. 518(7538):197-206en
dc.identifier.pmid25673413-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature14177-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/618114-
dc.description.abstractObesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNatureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/25673413/en
dc.rightsArchived with permission from Nature.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.titleGenetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biologyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.typeMeta-Analysisen
dc.identifier.journalNatureen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4382211-
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via PubMed Central. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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