Home urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/619081
Title:
Home urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes.
Authors:
Besser, R.; Shields, Beverley; Hammersley, S.; Colclough, K.; McDonald, Timothy J. ( 0000-0003-3559-6660 ) ; Gray, Z.; Heywood, J. J. N.; Barrett, T. G.; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
Making the correct diabetes diagnosis in children is crucial for lifelong management. Type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are seen in the pediatric setting, and can be difficult to discriminate from type 1 diabetes. Postprandial urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) is a non-invasive measure of endogenous insulin secretion that has not been tested as a diagnostic tool in children or in patients with diabetes duration <5 yr. We aimed to assess whether UCPCR can discriminate type 1 diabetes from MODY and type 2 in pediatric diabetes.
Citation:
Home urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes. 2013, 14 (3):181-8 Pediatr Diabetes
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Pediatric diabetes
Issue Date:
May-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/619081
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12008
PubMed ID:
23289766
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pedi.12008/abstract
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text from the publisher's site.
Type:
Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
en
ISSN:
1399-5448
Appears in Collections:
pre-2014 RD&E publications; Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Honorary contracts publications; Honorary contracts publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBesser, R.en
dc.contributor.authorShields, Beverleyen
dc.contributor.authorHammersley, S.en
dc.contributor.authorColclough, K.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorGray, Z.en
dc.contributor.authorHeywood, J. J. N.en
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, T. G.en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T09:57:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T09:57:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-
dc.identifier.citationHome urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes. 2013, 14 (3):181-8 Pediatr Diabetesen
dc.identifier.issn1399-5448-
dc.identifier.pmid23289766-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pedi.12008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/619081-
dc.description.abstractMaking the correct diabetes diagnosis in children is crucial for lifelong management. Type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are seen in the pediatric setting, and can be difficult to discriminate from type 1 diabetes. Postprandial urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) is a non-invasive measure of endogenous insulin secretion that has not been tested as a diagnostic tool in children or in patients with diabetes duration <5 yr. We aimed to assess whether UCPCR can discriminate type 1 diabetes from MODY and type 2 in pediatric diabetes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pedi.12008/abstracten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatric diabetesen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinology::Diabetesen
dc.titleHome urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) testing can identify type 2 and MODY in pediatric diabetes.en
dc.typeMulticenter Studyen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalPediatric diabetesen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text from the publisher's site.en
dc.description.fundingG0800661/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom NIHR-HCS-P12-03-03/Department of Health/United Kingdomen
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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