Infusion of routinely stored blood may limit reperfusion injury to acutely ischemic myocardial cells.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/619099
Title:
Infusion of routinely stored blood may limit reperfusion injury to acutely ischemic myocardial cells.
Authors:
Bagla, N.; Singh, Sarvpreet; Mangal, R.
Abstract:
Emergency thrombolysis and restoration of blood supply to acutely ischemic myocardium kills many reversibly injured muscle cells by free radicals generation and calcium influx. Such reversibly injured cells form the major bulk during the initial 10-20 min of ischaemia and in an era where emergency recanalization of arteries is possible, reperfusion injury becomes significant. Therefore, researchers have been trying to find out ways to limit the reperfusion injury by using antioxidants, complement inhibitors or by reperfusion of leucodepleted autologous blood. Red cell concentrates routinely available in blood banks are already depleted of plasma and hence calcium (chelated to the anticoagulant), leukocytes and most viable plasma proteins including complement. They have reduced oxygen content by virtue of storage; hence there might be less free radical generation. So infusion of such a blood through an intracoronary catheter might limit reperfusion injury. Addition of antioxidants or controlling the oxygen content while infusing this blood might give additional benefits. This hypothesis might be tested in animals by inducing controlled ischaemia with reperfusion of homologous cross-matched and group tested blood followed by cardiac radioactive scans. If the experimental results permit, clinical trials might be carried out eventually.
Citation:
Infusion of routinely stored blood may limit reperfusion injury to acutely ischemic myocardial cells. 2005, 64 (3):455-7 Med. Hypotheses
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Medical hypotheses
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/619099
DOI:
10.1016/j.mehy.2004.09.014
PubMed ID:
15617847
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987704005419
Note:
RD&E staff can access the full-text of this article via OpenAthens. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text and log in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0306-9877
Appears in Collections:
pre-2014 RD&E publications; Cardiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBagla, N.en
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Sarvpreeten
dc.contributor.authorMangal, R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T08:32:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T08:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationInfusion of routinely stored blood may limit reperfusion injury to acutely ischemic myocardial cells. 2005, 64 (3):455-7 Med. Hypothesesen
dc.identifier.issn0306-9877-
dc.identifier.pmid15617847-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mehy.2004.09.014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/619099-
dc.description.abstractEmergency thrombolysis and restoration of blood supply to acutely ischemic myocardium kills many reversibly injured muscle cells by free radicals generation and calcium influx. Such reversibly injured cells form the major bulk during the initial 10-20 min of ischaemia and in an era where emergency recanalization of arteries is possible, reperfusion injury becomes significant. Therefore, researchers have been trying to find out ways to limit the reperfusion injury by using antioxidants, complement inhibitors or by reperfusion of leucodepleted autologous blood. Red cell concentrates routinely available in blood banks are already depleted of plasma and hence calcium (chelated to the anticoagulant), leukocytes and most viable plasma proteins including complement. They have reduced oxygen content by virtue of storage; hence there might be less free radical generation. So infusion of such a blood through an intracoronary catheter might limit reperfusion injury. Addition of antioxidants or controlling the oxygen content while infusing this blood might give additional benefits. This hypothesis might be tested in animals by inducing controlled ischaemia with reperfusion of homologous cross-matched and group tested blood followed by cardiac radioactive scans. If the experimental results permit, clinical trials might be carried out eventually.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987704005419en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Medical hypothesesen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Cardiologyen
dc.titleInfusion of routinely stored blood may limit reperfusion injury to acutely ischemic myocardial cells.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalMedical hypothesesen
dc.description.noteRD&E staff can access the full-text of this article via OpenAthens. Click on the 'Additional Link' above to access the full-text and log in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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