‘Not a Plastic Surgeon’s best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK Plastic Surgery services’

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620198
Title:
‘Not a Plastic Surgeon’s best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK Plastic Surgery services’
Authors:
Cameron, Olivia; Al-Himdani, Sarah; Oliver, David W.
Abstract:
Injuries from dog bites are increasing in the United Kingdom (UK). Our study aims to highlight the public health burden of dog bites within the United Kingdom, in particular to the plastic and reconstructive surgeon. National data relating to hospital attendances and admissions was obtained from the Health and Social Care Information Database. Data relating to demographics of the patients admitted, the site and nature of the injury and the epidemiology was analysed. A total of 14,010 patients with dog bites were admitted between March 2013 and February 2015 of which 52% were admitted to Plastic and Reconstructive surgery departments. The incidence in 2014 increased by 6.5% compared with the previous year. The most frequent patient group were children under the age of nine (16%, n=1159) who most commonly sustained bites to the face and head. In total 19% of all dog bite injuries were associated with underlying fractures. Individuals living in most socially deprived areas (based on the national Index of Multiple Deprivation) were 2.8 times more likely to be admitted to hospital with a dog bite. In spite of the current UK legislation, the incidence of dog bites is increasing. Morbidity, mortality and considerable costs to the health service are amongst some of the consequences of these injuries.
Citation:
Not a Plastic Surgeon’s best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK Plastic Surgery services’ 2017 Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery
Issue Date:
8-Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620198
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjps.2016.12.007
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1748681517300062
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
17486815
Appears in Collections:
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery; 2017 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Oliviaen
dc.contributor.authorAl-Himdani, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorOliver, David W.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-19T12:33:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-19T12:33:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-08-
dc.identifier.citationNot a Plastic Surgeon’s best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK Plastic Surgery services’ 2017 Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgeryen
dc.identifier.issn17486815-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bjps.2016.12.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620198-
dc.description.abstractInjuries from dog bites are increasing in the United Kingdom (UK). Our study aims to highlight the public health burden of dog bites within the United Kingdom, in particular to the plastic and reconstructive surgeon. National data relating to hospital attendances and admissions was obtained from the Health and Social Care Information Database. Data relating to demographics of the patients admitted, the site and nature of the injury and the epidemiology was analysed. A total of 14,010 patients with dog bites were admitted between March 2013 and February 2015 of which 52% were admitted to Plastic and Reconstructive surgery departments. The incidence in 2014 increased by 6.5% compared with the previous year. The most frequent patient group were children under the age of nine (16%, n=1159) who most commonly sustained bites to the face and head. In total 19% of all dog bite injuries were associated with underlying fractures. Individuals living in most socially deprived areas (based on the national Index of Multiple Deprivation) were 2.8 times more likely to be admitted to hospital with a dog bite. In spite of the current UK legislation, the incidence of dog bites is increasing. Morbidity, mortality and considerable costs to the health service are amongst some of the consequences of these injuries.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1748681517300062en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgeryen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Surgery::Plastic surgeryen
dc.title‘Not a Plastic Surgeon’s best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK Plastic Surgery services’en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgeryen
dc.type.versionIn press (epub ahead of print)en
All Items in RD&E Research Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.