An epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620257
Title:
An epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication.
Authors:
Rijlaarsdam, J.; Pappa, I.; Walton, E.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.; Mileva-Seitz, V.R.; Rippe, R.C.A.; Roza, S.J.; Jaddoe, V. W.; Verhulst, F.C.; Felix, J. F.; Cecil, C.A.M.; Relton, C.L.; Gaunt, T.R.; McArdle, W.; Mill, Jonathan; Barker, E.D.; Tiemeier, H.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.
Abstract:
Prenatal maternal stress exposure has been associated with neonatal differential DNA methylation. However, the available evidence in humans is largely based on candidate gene methylation studies, where only a few CpG sites were evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and offspring genome-wide cord blood methylation using different methods. First, we conducted a meta-analysis and follow-up pathway analyses. Second, we used novel region discovery methods [i.e., differentially methylated regions (DMRs) analyses]. To this end, we used data from two independent population-based studies, the Generation R Study (n = 912) and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, n = 828), to (i) measure genome-wide DNA methylation in cord blood and (ii) extract a prenatal maternal stress composite. The meta-analysis (ntotal = 1,740) revealed no epigenome-wide (meta P <1.00e-07) associations of prenatal maternal stress exposure with neonatal differential DNA methylation. Follow-up analyses of the top hits derived from our epigenome-wide meta-analysis (meta P <1.00e-04) indicated an over-representation of the methyltransferase activity pathway. We identified no Bonferroni-corrected (P <1.00e-06) DMRs associated with prenatal maternal stress exposure. Combining data from two independent population-based samples in an epigenome-wide meta-analysis, the current study indicates that there are no large effects of prenatal maternal stress exposure on neonatal DNA methylation. Such replication efforts are essential in the search for robust associations, whether derived from candidate gene methylation or epigenome-wide studies.
Citation:
An epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication. 2016, 11 (2):140-9 Epigenetics
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Epigenetics
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620257
DOI:
10.1080/15592294.2016.1145329
PubMed ID:
26889969
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592294.2016.1145329
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text from the publisher’s site.
Type:
Meta-Analysis; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Language:
en
ISSN:
1559-2308
Appears in Collections:
Honorary contracts publications; 2016 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRijlaarsdam, J.en
dc.contributor.authorPappa, I.en
dc.contributor.authorWalton, E.en
dc.contributor.authorBakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.en
dc.contributor.authorMileva-Seitz, V.R.en
dc.contributor.authorRippe, R.C.A.en
dc.contributor.authorRoza, S.J.en
dc.contributor.authorJaddoe, V. W.en
dc.contributor.authorVerhulst, F.C.en
dc.contributor.authorFelix, J. F.en
dc.contributor.authorCecil, C.A.M.en
dc.contributor.authorRelton, C.L.en
dc.contributor.authorGaunt, T.R.en
dc.contributor.authorMcArdle, W.en
dc.contributor.authorMill, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E.D.en
dc.contributor.authorTiemeier, H.en
dc.contributor.authorvan IJzendoorn, M.H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-10T12:43:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-10T12:43:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAn epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication. 2016, 11 (2):140-9 Epigeneticsen
dc.identifier.issn1559-2308-
dc.identifier.pmid26889969-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15592294.2016.1145329-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620257-
dc.description.abstractPrenatal maternal stress exposure has been associated with neonatal differential DNA methylation. However, the available evidence in humans is largely based on candidate gene methylation studies, where only a few CpG sites were evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and offspring genome-wide cord blood methylation using different methods. First, we conducted a meta-analysis and follow-up pathway analyses. Second, we used novel region discovery methods [i.e., differentially methylated regions (DMRs) analyses]. To this end, we used data from two independent population-based studies, the Generation R Study (n = 912) and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, n = 828), to (i) measure genome-wide DNA methylation in cord blood and (ii) extract a prenatal maternal stress composite. The meta-analysis (ntotal = 1,740) revealed no epigenome-wide (meta P <1.00e-07) associations of prenatal maternal stress exposure with neonatal differential DNA methylation. Follow-up analyses of the top hits derived from our epigenome-wide meta-analysis (meta P <1.00e-04) indicated an over-representation of the methyltransferase activity pathway. We identified no Bonferroni-corrected (P <1.00e-06) DMRs associated with prenatal maternal stress exposure. Combining data from two independent population-based samples in an epigenome-wide meta-analysis, the current study indicates that there are no large effects of prenatal maternal stress exposure on neonatal DNA methylation. Such replication efforts are essential in the search for robust associations, whether derived from candidate gene methylation or epigenome-wide studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592294.2016.1145329en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epigeneticsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Obstetrics. Midwiferyen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Psychologyen
dc.titleAn epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication.en
dc.typeMeta-Analysisen
dc.typeResearch Support, N.I.H., Extramuralen
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.journalEpigeneticsen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text from the publisher’s site.en
dc.description.funding092731/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom R01HD068437/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States Medical Research Council/United Kingdom 102215/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom MC_UU_12013/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom MC_UU_12013/2/Medical Research Council/United Kingdomen
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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