Bisphenol A causes reproductive toxicity, decreases dnmt1 transcription, and reduces global DNA methylation in breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio).

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620260
Title:
Bisphenol A causes reproductive toxicity, decreases dnmt1 transcription, and reduces global DNA methylation in breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio).
Authors:
Laing, Lauren; Viana, Joana; Dempster, Emma; Trznadel, M.; Trunkfield, L.A.; Uren Webster, T.M.; van Aerle, R.; Paull, G.C.; Wilson, R.J.; Mill, Jonathan; Santos, E. M.
Abstract:
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a commercially important high production chemical widely used in epoxy resins and polycarbonate plastics, and is ubiquitous in the environment. Previous studies demonstrated that BPA activates estrogenic signaling pathways associated with adverse effects on reproduction in vertebrates and that exposure can induce epigenetic changes. We aimed to investigate the reproductive effects of BPA in a fish model and to document its mechanisms of toxicity. We exposed breeding groups of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/L BPA for 15 d. We observed a significant increase in egg production, together with a reduced rate of fertilization in fish exposed to 1 mg/L BPA, associated with significant alterations in the transcription of genes involved in reproductive function and epigenetic processes in both liver and gonad tissue at concentrations representing hotspots of environmental contamination (0.1 mg/L) and above. Of note, we observed reduced expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (dnmt1) at environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA, along with a significant reduction in global DNA methylation, in testes and ovaries following exposure to 1 mg/L BPA. Our findings demonstrate that BPA disrupts reproductive processes in zebrafish, likely via estrogenic mechanisms, and that environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA are associated with altered transcription of key enzymes involved in DNA methylation maintenance. These findings provide evidence of the mechanisms of action of BPA in a model vertebrate and advocate for its reduction in the environment.
Citation:
Bisphenol A causes reproductive toxicity, decreases dnmt1 transcription, and reduces global DNA methylation in breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio). 2016, 11 (7):526-38 Epigenetics
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Epigenetics
Issue Date:
2-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620260
DOI:
10.1080/15592294.2016.1182272
PubMed ID:
27120497
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592294.2016.1182272
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text from the publisher’s site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1559-2308
Appears in Collections:
Honorary contracts publications; 2016 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaing, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorViana, Joanaen
dc.contributor.authorDempster, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorTrznadel, M.en
dc.contributor.authorTrunkfield, L.A.en
dc.contributor.authorUren Webster, T.M.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Aerle, R.en
dc.contributor.authorPaull, G.C.en
dc.contributor.authorWilson, R.J.en
dc.contributor.authorMill, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorSantos, E. M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-10T13:34:43Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-10T13:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-02-
dc.identifier.citationBisphenol A causes reproductive toxicity, decreases dnmt1 transcription, and reduces global DNA methylation in breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio). 2016, 11 (7):526-38 Epigeneticsen
dc.identifier.issn1559-2308-
dc.identifier.pmid27120497-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15592294.2016.1182272-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620260-
dc.description.abstractBisphenol A (BPA) is a commercially important high production chemical widely used in epoxy resins and polycarbonate plastics, and is ubiquitous in the environment. Previous studies demonstrated that BPA activates estrogenic signaling pathways associated with adverse effects on reproduction in vertebrates and that exposure can induce epigenetic changes. We aimed to investigate the reproductive effects of BPA in a fish model and to document its mechanisms of toxicity. We exposed breeding groups of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/L BPA for 15 d. We observed a significant increase in egg production, together with a reduced rate of fertilization in fish exposed to 1 mg/L BPA, associated with significant alterations in the transcription of genes involved in reproductive function and epigenetic processes in both liver and gonad tissue at concentrations representing hotspots of environmental contamination (0.1 mg/L) and above. Of note, we observed reduced expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (dnmt1) at environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA, along with a significant reduction in global DNA methylation, in testes and ovaries following exposure to 1 mg/L BPA. Our findings demonstrate that BPA disrupts reproductive processes in zebrafish, likely via estrogenic mechanisms, and that environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA are associated with altered transcription of key enzymes involved in DNA methylation maintenance. These findings provide evidence of the mechanisms of action of BPA in a model vertebrate and advocate for its reduction in the environment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592294.2016.1182272en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epigeneticsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.titleBisphenol A causes reproductive toxicity, decreases dnmt1 transcription, and reduces global DNA methylation in breeding zebrafish (Danio rerio).en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalEpigeneticsen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the ‘Additional Link’ above to access the full-text from the publisher’s site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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