Slow wave sleep and accelerated forgetting.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620337
Title:
Slow wave sleep and accelerated forgetting.
Authors:
Atherton, K. E.; Nobre, A. C.; Lazar, A. S.; Wulff, K.; Whittaker, R. G.; Dhawan, V.; Lazar, Z. I.; Zeman, Adam; Butler, C. R.
Abstract:
We investigated whether the benefit of slow wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation typically observed in healthy individuals is disrupted in people with accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) due to epilepsy. SWS is thought to play an active role in declarative memory in healthy individuals and, furthermore, electrographic epileptiform activity is often more prevalent during SWS than during wakefulness or other sleep stages. We studied the relationship between SWS and the benefit of sleep for memory retention using a word-pair associates task. In both the ALF and the healthy control groups, sleep conferred a memory benefit. However, the relationship between the amount of SWS and sleep-related memory benefits differed significantly between the groups. In healthy participants, the amount of SWS correlated positively with sleep-related memory benefits. In stark contrast, the more SWS, the smaller the sleep-related memory benefit in the ALF group. Therefore, contrary to its role in healthy people, SWS-associated brain activity appears to be deleterious for memory in patients with ALF.
Citation:
Slow wave sleep and accelerated forgetting. 2016, 84:80-89 Cortex
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
Issue Date:
Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620337
DOI:
10.1016/j.cortex.2016.08.013
PubMed ID:
27710778
Additional Links:
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-9452(16)30237-4
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1973-8102
Appears in Collections:
Neurology; 2016 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAtherton, K. E.en
dc.contributor.authorNobre, A. C.en
dc.contributor.authorLazar, A. S.en
dc.contributor.authorWulff, K.en
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, R. G.en
dc.contributor.authorDhawan, V.en
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Z. I.en
dc.contributor.authorZeman, Adamen
dc.contributor.authorButler, C. R.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-24T13:12:58Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-24T13:12:58Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-
dc.identifier.citationSlow wave sleep and accelerated forgetting. 2016, 84:80-89 Cortexen
dc.identifier.issn1973-8102-
dc.identifier.pmid27710778-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cortex.2016.08.013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620337-
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether the benefit of slow wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation typically observed in healthy individuals is disrupted in people with accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) due to epilepsy. SWS is thought to play an active role in declarative memory in healthy individuals and, furthermore, electrographic epileptiform activity is often more prevalent during SWS than during wakefulness or other sleep stages. We studied the relationship between SWS and the benefit of sleep for memory retention using a word-pair associates task. In both the ALF and the healthy control groups, sleep conferred a memory benefit. However, the relationship between the amount of SWS and sleep-related memory benefits differed significantly between the groups. In healthy participants, the amount of SWS correlated positively with sleep-related memory benefits. In stark contrast, the more SWS, the smaller the sleep-related memory benefit in the ALF group. Therefore, contrary to its role in healthy people, SWS-associated brain activity appears to be deleterious for memory in patients with ALF.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-9452(16)30237-4en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Neurologyen
dc.titleSlow wave sleep and accelerated forgetting.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalCortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavioren
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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