Longitudinal analyses of the DNA methylome in deployed military servicemen identify susceptibility loci for post-traumatic stress disorder.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620430
Title:
Longitudinal analyses of the DNA methylome in deployed military servicemen identify susceptibility loci for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Authors:
Rutten, B P F; Vermetten, E; Vinkers, C H; Ursini, G; Daskalakis, N P; Pishva, E; de Nijs, L; Houtepen, L C; Eijssen, L; Jaffe, A E; Kenis, G; Viechtbauer, W; van den Hove, D; Schraut, K G; Lesch, K-P; Kleinman, J E; Hyde, T M; Weinberger, D R; Schalkwyk, L; Lunnon, K; Mill, Jonathan; Cohen, H; Yehuda, R; Baker, D G; Maihofer, A X; Nievergelt, C M; Geuze, E; Boks, M P M
Abstract:
In order to determine the impact of the epigenetic response to traumatic stress on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this study examined longitudinal changes of genome-wide blood DNA methylation profiles in relation to the development of PTSD symptoms in two prospective military cohorts (one discovery and one replication data set). In the first cohort consisting of male Dutch military servicemen (n=93), the emergence of PTSD symptoms over a deployment period to a combat zone was significantly associated with alterations in DNA methylation levels at 17 genomic positions and 12 genomic regions. Evidence for mediation of the relation between combat trauma and PTSD symptoms by longitudinal changes in DNA methylation was observed at several positions and regions. Bioinformatic analyses of the reported associations identified significant enrichment in several pathways relevant for symptoms of PTSD. Targeted analyses of the significant findings from the discovery sample in an independent prospective cohort of male US marines (n=98) replicated the observed relation between decreases in DNA methylation levels and PTSD symptoms at genomic regions in ZFP57, RNF39 and HIST1H2APS2. Together, our study pinpoints three novel genomic regions where longitudinal decreases in DNA methylation across the period of exposure to combat trauma marks susceptibility for PTSD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 20 June 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.120.
Citation:
Longitudinal analyses of the DNA methylome in deployed military servicemen identify susceptibility loci for post-traumatic stress disorder. 2017 Mol. Psychiatry
Publisher:
Nature
Journal:
Molecular psychiatry
Issue Date:
20-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620430
DOI:
10.1038/mp.2017.120
PubMed ID:
28630453
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.120
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-5578
Appears in Collections:
Honorary contracts publications; 2017 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRutten, B P Fen
dc.contributor.authorVermetten, Een
dc.contributor.authorVinkers, C Hen
dc.contributor.authorUrsini, Gen
dc.contributor.authorDaskalakis, N Pen
dc.contributor.authorPishva, Een
dc.contributor.authorde Nijs, Len
dc.contributor.authorHoutepen, L Cen
dc.contributor.authorEijssen, Len
dc.contributor.authorJaffe, A Een
dc.contributor.authorKenis, Gen
dc.contributor.authorViechtbauer, Wen
dc.contributor.authorvan den Hove, Den
dc.contributor.authorSchraut, K Gen
dc.contributor.authorLesch, K-Pen
dc.contributor.authorKleinman, J Een
dc.contributor.authorHyde, T Men
dc.contributor.authorWeinberger, D Ren
dc.contributor.authorSchalkwyk, Len
dc.contributor.authorLunnon, Ken
dc.contributor.authorMill, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Hen
dc.contributor.authorYehuda, Ren
dc.contributor.authorBaker, D Gen
dc.contributor.authorMaihofer, A Xen
dc.contributor.authorNievergelt, C Men
dc.contributor.authorGeuze, Een
dc.contributor.authorBoks, M P Men
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-11T14:47:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-11T14:47:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-20-
dc.identifier.citationLongitudinal analyses of the DNA methylome in deployed military servicemen identify susceptibility loci for post-traumatic stress disorder. 2017 Mol. Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1476-5578-
dc.identifier.pmid28630453-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/mp.2017.120-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620430-
dc.description.abstractIn order to determine the impact of the epigenetic response to traumatic stress on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this study examined longitudinal changes of genome-wide blood DNA methylation profiles in relation to the development of PTSD symptoms in two prospective military cohorts (one discovery and one replication data set). In the first cohort consisting of male Dutch military servicemen (n=93), the emergence of PTSD symptoms over a deployment period to a combat zone was significantly associated with alterations in DNA methylation levels at 17 genomic positions and 12 genomic regions. Evidence for mediation of the relation between combat trauma and PTSD symptoms by longitudinal changes in DNA methylation was observed at several positions and regions. Bioinformatic analyses of the reported associations identified significant enrichment in several pathways relevant for symptoms of PTSD. Targeted analyses of the significant findings from the discovery sample in an independent prospective cohort of male US marines (n=98) replicated the observed relation between decreases in DNA methylation levels and PTSD symptoms at genomic regions in ZFP57, RNF39 and HIST1H2APS2. Together, our study pinpoints three novel genomic regions where longitudinal decreases in DNA methylation across the period of exposure to combat trauma marks susceptibility for PTSD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 20 June 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.120.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNatureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.120en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Molecular psychiatryen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Mental healthen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.titleLongitudinal analyses of the DNA methylome in deployed military servicemen identify susceptibility loci for post-traumatic stress disorder.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular psychiatryen
dc.type.versionPublisheden

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in RD&E Research Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.