Mildly elevated lactate levels are associated with microcirculatory flow abnormalities and increased mortality: a microSOAP post hoc analysis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620505
Title:
Mildly elevated lactate levels are associated with microcirculatory flow abnormalities and increased mortality: a microSOAP post hoc analysis.
Authors:
Vellinga, N A R; Boerma, E C; Koopmans, M; Donati, A; Dubin, A; Shapiro, N I; Pearse, R M; van der Voort, P H J; Dondorp, A M; Bafi, T; Fries, M; Akarsu-Ayazoglu, T; Pranskunas, A; Hollenberg, S; Balestra, G; van Iterson, M; Sadaka, F; Minto, G; Aypar, U; Hurtado, F J; Martinelli, G; Payen, D; van Haren, F; Holley, A; Gomez, H; Mehta, R L; Rodriguez, A H; Ruiz, C; Canales, HS; Duranteau, J; Spronk, P E; Jhanji, S; Hubble, Sheena; Chierego, M; Jung, C; Martin, D; Sorbara, C; Bakker, J; Ince, C
Abstract:
Mildly elevated lactate levels (i.e., 1-2 mmol/L) are increasingly recognized as a prognostic finding in critically ill patients. One of several possible underlying mechanisms, microcirculatory dysfunction, can be assessed at the bedside using sublingual direct in vivo microscopy. We aimed to evaluate the association between relative hyperlactatemia, microcirculatory flow, and outcome.
Citation:
Mildly elevated lactate levels are associated with microcirculatory flow abnormalities and increased mortality: a microSOAP post hoc analysis. 2017, 21 (1):255 Crit Care
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
Critical care (London, England)
Issue Date:
18-Oct-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620505
DOI:
10.1186/s13054-017-1842-7
PubMed ID:
29047411
Additional Links:
https://ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13054-017-1842-7
Note:
This article is freely available online via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1466-609X
Appears in Collections:
Intensive Care Unit (ICU); 2017 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVellinga, N A Ren
dc.contributor.authorBoerma, E Cen
dc.contributor.authorKoopmans, Men
dc.contributor.authorDonati, Aen
dc.contributor.authorDubin, Aen
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, N Ien
dc.contributor.authorPearse, R Men
dc.contributor.authorvan der Voort, P H Jen
dc.contributor.authorDondorp, A Men
dc.contributor.authorBafi, Ten
dc.contributor.authorFries, Men
dc.contributor.authorAkarsu-Ayazoglu, Ten
dc.contributor.authorPranskunas, Aen
dc.contributor.authorHollenberg, Sen
dc.contributor.authorBalestra, Gen
dc.contributor.authorvan Iterson, Men
dc.contributor.authorSadaka, Fen
dc.contributor.authorMinto, Gen
dc.contributor.authorAypar, Uen
dc.contributor.authorHurtado, F Jen
dc.contributor.authorMartinelli, Gen
dc.contributor.authorPayen, Den
dc.contributor.authorvan Haren, Fen
dc.contributor.authorHolley, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGomez, Hen
dc.contributor.authorMehta, R Len
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, A Hen
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, Cen
dc.contributor.authorCanales, HSen
dc.contributor.authorDuranteau, Jen
dc.contributor.authorSpronk, P Een
dc.contributor.authorJhanji, Sen
dc.contributor.authorHubble, Sheenaen
dc.contributor.authorChierego, Men
dc.contributor.authorJung, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Den
dc.contributor.authorSorbara, Cen
dc.contributor.authorBakker, Jen
dc.contributor.authorInce, Cen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T13:00:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-13T13:00:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-18-
dc.identifier.citationMildly elevated lactate levels are associated with microcirculatory flow abnormalities and increased mortality: a microSOAP post hoc analysis. 2017, 21 (1):255 Crit Careen
dc.identifier.issn1466-609X-
dc.identifier.pmid29047411-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13054-017-1842-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620505-
dc.description.abstractMildly elevated lactate levels (i.e., 1-2 mmol/L) are increasingly recognized as a prognostic finding in critically ill patients. One of several possible underlying mechanisms, microcirculatory dysfunction, can be assessed at the bedside using sublingual direct in vivo microscopy. We aimed to evaluate the association between relative hyperlactatemia, microcirculatory flow, and outcome.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttps://ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13054-017-1842-7en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Critical care (London, England). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stateden
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Practice of medicine::Intensive careen
dc.titleMildly elevated lactate levels are associated with microcirculatory flow abnormalities and increased mortality: a microSOAP post hoc analysis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalCritical care (London, England)en
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available online via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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