2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620534
Title:
Acute appendicitis
Authors:
Sellars, H.; Boorman, Patricia A.
Abstract:
Appendicitis is defined as inflammation of the vermiform appendix, the most common surgical emergency in children and young adults with abdominal pain. The current standard of care for patients with appendicitis is the surgical appendicectomy, either laparoscopic or open. A non-operative strategy with antibiotics is favourable in some cases and emerging evidence suggests there could be wider applicability. Diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination and laboratory tests, although 30–45% of patients exhibit atypical signs and symptoms on presentation. Where the diagnosis remains ambiguous, ultrasound and CT scans are the most widely used imaging modalities. Diagnostic laparoscopy can be a useful approach in low-risk patients, particularly young women. Appendicitis is classified into simple or complex disease, complex in the presence of a peri-appendicular abscess, gangrene or perforation. Complex appendicitis has significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Limiting the progression from simple to complex disease, although not inevitable, is the rationale for early definitive treatment. An appendicectomy performed for suspected appendicitis resulting in a normal appendix on histopathological examination is referred to as a negative appendicectomy. A negative appendicectomy has a postoperative complication rate of around 10%, demonstrating the need for both accurate and timely diagnosis.
Citation:
Acute appendicitis 2017, 35 (8):432 Surgery (Oxford)
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Surgery (Oxford)
Issue Date:
Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620534
DOI:
10.1016/j.mpsur.2017.06.002
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0263931917301345
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
02639319
Appears in Collections:
Colorectal Surgery; 2017 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSellars, H.en
dc.contributor.authorBoorman, Patricia A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-22T10:06:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-22T10:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-
dc.identifier.citationAcute appendicitis 2017, 35 (8):432 Surgery (Oxford)en
dc.identifier.issn02639319-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mpsur.2017.06.002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620534-
dc.description.abstractAppendicitis is defined as inflammation of the vermiform appendix, the most common surgical emergency in children and young adults with abdominal pain. The current standard of care for patients with appendicitis is the surgical appendicectomy, either laparoscopic or open. A non-operative strategy with antibiotics is favourable in some cases and emerging evidence suggests there could be wider applicability. Diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination and laboratory tests, although 30–45% of patients exhibit atypical signs and symptoms on presentation. Where the diagnosis remains ambiguous, ultrasound and CT scans are the most widely used imaging modalities. Diagnostic laparoscopy can be a useful approach in low-risk patients, particularly young women. Appendicitis is classified into simple or complex disease, complex in the presence of a peri-appendicular abscess, gangrene or perforation. Complex appendicitis has significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Limiting the progression from simple to complex disease, although not inevitable, is the rationale for early definitive treatment. An appendicectomy performed for suspected appendicitis resulting in a normal appendix on histopathological examination is referred to as a negative appendicectomy. A negative appendicectomy has a postoperative complication rate of around 10%, demonstrating the need for both accurate and timely diagnosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0263931917301345en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Surgery (Oxford)en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Gastroenterologyen
dc.titleAcute appendicitisen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalSurgery (Oxford)en
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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