The mass effect of a slowly growing GIST.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620655
Title:
The mass effect of a slowly growing GIST.
Authors:
Prakash, Deepali; Siragusa, Leandro; Wajed, Saj; Manzelli, Antonio
Abstract:
Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are typically defined as solid masses arising from the GI tract, most commonly from the stomach and small intestine. They seldom present in a cystic form. Management of cystic masses arising from the GI tract may pose a diagnostic predicament. We had one such case that presented itself with complaints of a slow growing intra-abdominal mass. An ultrasound scan demonstrated a thick-walled cystic lesion arising from the pelvis. Further imaging evaluations in the form of a CT scan revealed a complex large cystic mass arising from left upper quadrant (see Figure 1). Due to the uncertainty of origin of this mass and lack of invasion or lymphadenopathy, it was thought to be benign. After a multidisciplinary meeting, it was concluded that an urgent surgical excision of this benign mass was the best treatment. The surgical treatment of which entailed a 10 hours surgery to resect this 10 kg lesion, which comprised 7 L fluid and 3 kg solid mass. Histopathology aided in the diagnosis of this lesion as a CD117-positive and DOG1-positive GIST.
Citation:
The mass effect of a slowly growing GIST. 2018, 2018 BMJ Case Rep
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
BMJ case reports
Issue Date:
5-Mar-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620655
DOI:
10.1136/bcr-2017-222556
PubMed ID:
29507015
Additional Links:
http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2018/bcr-2017-222556.abstract
Note:
This case report is available to RD&E staff. Click on the Additional Link above and access the full-text via the publisher's site, logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.
Type:
Case Report
Language:
en
ISSN:
1757-790X
Appears in Collections:
Upper Gastro-Intestinal Surgery; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrakash, Deepalien
dc.contributor.authorSiragusa, Leandroen
dc.contributor.authorWajed, Sajen
dc.contributor.authorManzelli, Antonioen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-27T12:55:12Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-27T12:55:12Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-05-
dc.identifier.citationThe mass effect of a slowly growing GIST. 2018, 2018 BMJ Case Repen
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X-
dc.identifier.pmid29507015-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr-2017-222556-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620655-
dc.description.abstractGastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are typically defined as solid masses arising from the GI tract, most commonly from the stomach and small intestine. They seldom present in a cystic form. Management of cystic masses arising from the GI tract may pose a diagnostic predicament. We had one such case that presented itself with complaints of a slow growing intra-abdominal mass. An ultrasound scan demonstrated a thick-walled cystic lesion arising from the pelvis. Further imaging evaluations in the form of a CT scan revealed a complex large cystic mass arising from left upper quadrant (see Figure 1). Due to the uncertainty of origin of this mass and lack of invasion or lymphadenopathy, it was thought to be benign. After a multidisciplinary meeting, it was concluded that an urgent surgical excision of this benign mass was the best treatment. The surgical treatment of which entailed a 10 hours surgery to resect this 10 kg lesion, which comprised 7 L fluid and 3 kg solid mass. Histopathology aided in the diagnosis of this lesion as a CD117-positive and DOG1-positive GIST.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://casereports.bmj.com/content/2018/bcr-2017-222556.abstracten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ case reportsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Gastroenterologyen
dc.titleThe mass effect of a slowly growing GIST.en
dc.typeCase Reporten
dc.identifier.journalBMJ case reportsen
dc.description.noteThis case report is available to RD&E staff. Click on the Additional Link above and access the full-text via the publisher's site, logging in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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