Clinical evaluation of silicone gel in the treatment of cleft lip scars.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620722
Title:
Clinical evaluation of silicone gel in the treatment of cleft lip scars.
Authors:
Chang, C-S; Wallace, Christopher G ( 0000-0003-1897-9520 ) ; Hsiao, Y-C; Huang, J-J; Chen, Z-C; Chang, C-J; Lo, L-J; Chen, P. K-T; Chen, J-P; Chen, Y-R
Abstract:
Upper lip scars are at risk of hypertrophy. Our center therefore uses microporous tape and silicone sheeting for postoperative scar care following cleft lip repair. However, some babies have previously ingested their silicone sheeting, which has the potential for respiratory compromise or gastrointestinal obstruction. Self-dry silicone gel is reportedly also effective for preventing hypertrophic scars. Hence, we sought to test whether silicone gel, which cannot be ingested whole, might be non-inferior to silicone sheeting for controlling against upper lip scar hypertrophy. This was a mixed prospective and retrospective case-controlled clinical trial involving patients undergoing unilateral cleft lip repair, 29 of whom received standard postoperative silicone sheeting (control group) and another 33 age-matched consecutive patients who received self-dry silicone instead. The Vancouver scar scale, visual analogue scale and photographically assessed scar width assessments were the same in both groups at six months after surgery. In conclusion, silicone gel appears to be non-inferior to silicone sheeting for postoperative care of upper lip scars as judged by scar quality at six months, but silicone sheeting has the safety disadvantage that it can be swallowed whole by babies. It is thus recommended that silicone gel be used for upper lip scar management in babies.
Citation:
Clinical evaluation of silicone gel in the treatment of cleft lip scars. 2018, 8 (1):7422 Sci Rep
Publisher:
Nature
Journal:
Scientific reports
Issue Date:
9-May-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620722
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-25697-x
PubMed ID:
29743500
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25697-x
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2045-2322
Appears in Collections:
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChang, C-Sen
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Christopher Gen
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, Y-Cen
dc.contributor.authorHuang, J-Jen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z-Cen
dc.contributor.authorChang, C-Jen
dc.contributor.authorLo, L-Jen
dc.contributor.authorChen, P. K-Ten
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-Pen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y-Ren
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-22T15:29:52Z-
dc.date.available2018-06-22T15:29:52Z-
dc.date.issued2018-05-09-
dc.identifier.citationClinical evaluation of silicone gel in the treatment of cleft lip scars. 2018, 8 (1):7422 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.pmid29743500-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-25697-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620722-
dc.description.abstractUpper lip scars are at risk of hypertrophy. Our center therefore uses microporous tape and silicone sheeting for postoperative scar care following cleft lip repair. However, some babies have previously ingested their silicone sheeting, which has the potential for respiratory compromise or gastrointestinal obstruction. Self-dry silicone gel is reportedly also effective for preventing hypertrophic scars. Hence, we sought to test whether silicone gel, which cannot be ingested whole, might be non-inferior to silicone sheeting for controlling against upper lip scar hypertrophy. This was a mixed prospective and retrospective case-controlled clinical trial involving patients undergoing unilateral cleft lip repair, 29 of whom received standard postoperative silicone sheeting (control group) and another 33 age-matched consecutive patients who received self-dry silicone instead. The Vancouver scar scale, visual analogue scale and photographically assessed scar width assessments were the same in both groups at six months after surgery. In conclusion, silicone gel appears to be non-inferior to silicone sheeting for postoperative care of upper lip scars as judged by scar quality at six months, but silicone sheeting has the safety disadvantage that it can be swallowed whole by babies. It is thus recommended that silicone gel be used for upper lip scar management in babies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNatureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25697-xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scientific reports. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Surgery::Plastic surgeryen
dc.titleClinical evaluation of silicone gel in the treatment of cleft lip scars.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionPublisheden

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