Effectiveness and safety of long-term treatment with sulfonylureas in patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations: an international cohort study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620742
Title:
Effectiveness and safety of long-term treatment with sulfonylureas in patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations: an international cohort study.
Authors:
Bowman, P. [et al] inc.; Shepherd, Maggie H; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
KCNJ11 mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes through pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium channel activation. 90% of patients successfully transfer from insulin to oral sulfonylureas with excellent initial glycaemic control; however, whether this control is maintained in the long term is unclear. Sulfonylurea failure is seen in about 44% of people with type 2 diabetes after 5 years of treatment. Therefore, we did a 10-year multicentre follow-up study of a large international cohort of patients with KCNJ11 permanent neonatal diabetes to address the key questions relating to long-term efficacy and safety of sulfonylureas in these patients.
Citation:
Effectiveness and safety of long-term treatment with sulfonylureas in patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations: an international cohort study. 2018 Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
The Lancet. Diabetes & Endocrinology
Issue Date:
4-Jun-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620742
DOI:
10.1016/S2213-8587(18)30106-2
PubMed ID:
29880308
Additional Links:
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2213-8587(18)30106-2
Note:
This article is available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2213-8595
Appears in Collections:
Diabetes/Endocrine Services; Molecular Genetics; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBowman, P. [et al] inc.en
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Maggie Hen
dc.contributor.authorEllard, Sianen
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T14:24:45Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-04T14:24:45Z-
dc.date.issued2018-06-04-
dc.identifier.citationEffectiveness and safety of long-term treatment with sulfonylureas in patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations: an international cohort study. 2018 Lancet Diabetes Endocrinolen
dc.identifier.issn2213-8595-
dc.identifier.pmid29880308-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S2213-8587(18)30106-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620742-
dc.description.abstractKCNJ11 mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes through pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium channel activation. 90% of patients successfully transfer from insulin to oral sulfonylureas with excellent initial glycaemic control; however, whether this control is maintained in the long term is unclear. Sulfonylurea failure is seen in about 44% of people with type 2 diabetes after 5 years of treatment. Therefore, we did a 10-year multicentre follow-up study of a large international cohort of patients with KCNJ11 permanent neonatal diabetes to address the key questions relating to long-term efficacy and safety of sulfonylureas in these patients.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2213-8587(18)30106-2en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The lancet. Diabetes & endocrinology. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinology::Diabetesen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.titleEffectiveness and safety of long-term treatment with sulfonylureas in patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations: an international cohort study.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Lancet. Diabetes & Endocrinologyen
dc.description.noteThis article is available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionIn press (epub ahead of print)en

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