Percutaneous suction and irrigation for the treatment of recalcitrant pyogenic spondylodiscitis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620828
Title:
Percutaneous suction and irrigation for the treatment of recalcitrant pyogenic spondylodiscitis.
Authors:
Griffith-Jones, William; Nasto, L. A.; Pola, E.; Stokes, Oliver M.; Mehdian, H.
Abstract:
The primary management of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is conservative. Once the causative organism has been identified, by blood culture or biopsy, administration of appropriate intravenous antibiotics is started. Occasionally patients do not respond to antibiotics and surgical irrigation and debridement is needed. The treatment of these cases is challenging and controversial. Furthermore, many affected patients have significant comorbidities often precluding more extensive surgical intervention. The aim of this study is to describe early results of a novel, minimally invasive percutaneous technique for disc irrigation and debridement in pyogenic spondylodiscitis.
Citation:
Percutaneous suction and irrigation for the treatment of recalcitrant pyogenic spondylodiscitis. 2018, 19 (1):10 J Orthop Traumatol
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of orthopaedics and traumatology : official journal of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Issue Date:
20-Aug-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620828
DOI:
10.1186/s10195-018-0496-9
PubMed ID:
30123957
Additional Links:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30123957/
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's site
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1590-9999
Appears in Collections:
Exeter Spinal Surgery Unit; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriffith-Jones, Williamen
dc.contributor.authorNasto, L. A.en
dc.contributor.authorPola, E.en
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Oliver M.en
dc.contributor.authorMehdian, H.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T11:58:03Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-02T11:58:03Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-20-
dc.identifier.citationPercutaneous suction and irrigation for the treatment of recalcitrant pyogenic spondylodiscitis. 2018, 19 (1):10 J Orthop Traumatolen
dc.identifier.issn1590-9999-
dc.identifier.pmid30123957-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s10195-018-0496-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620828-
dc.description.abstractThe primary management of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is conservative. Once the causative organism has been identified, by blood culture or biopsy, administration of appropriate intravenous antibiotics is started. Occasionally patients do not respond to antibiotics and surgical irrigation and debridement is needed. The treatment of these cases is challenging and controversial. Furthermore, many affected patients have significant comorbidities often precluding more extensive surgical intervention. The aim of this study is to describe early results of a novel, minimally invasive percutaneous technique for disc irrigation and debridement in pyogenic spondylodiscitis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30123957/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of orthopaedics and traumatology : official journal of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Orthopaedicsen
dc.titlePercutaneous suction and irrigation for the treatment of recalcitrant pyogenic spondylodiscitis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of orthopaedics and traumatology : official journal of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatologyen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Additional Link above to access the full-text via the publisher's siteen
dc.type.versionPublisheden
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