Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for body fat distribution in 694,649 individuals of European ancestry.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620841
Title:
Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for body fat distribution in 694,649 individuals of European ancestry.
Authors:
Pulit, S. L. [et al]; Hattersley, Andrew T.
Abstract:
One in four adults worldwide are either overweight or obese. Epidemiological studies indicate that the location and distribution of excess fat, rather than general adiposity, is most informative for predicting risk of obesity sequellae, including cardiometabolic disease and cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of body fat distribution, measured by waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI), and identified 463 signals in 346 loci. Heritability and variant effects were generally stronger in women than men, and we found approximately one-third of all signals to be sexually dimorphic. The 5% of individuals carrying the most WHRadjBMI-increasing alleles were 1.62 times more likely than the bottom 5% to have a WHR above the thresholds used for metabolic syndrome. These data, made publicly available, will inform the biology of body fat distribution and its relationship with disease.
Citation:
Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for body fat distribution in 694,649 individuals of European ancestry. 2018 Hum. Mol. Genet.
Publisher:
Oxford Academic
Journal:
Human molecular genetics
Issue Date:
14-Sep-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620841
DOI:
10.1093/hmg/ddy327
PubMed ID:
30239722
Additional Links:
https://academic.oup.com/hmg/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/hmg/ddy327
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1460-2083
Appears in Collections:
Diabetes/Endocrine Services; 2018 RD&E publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPulit, S. L. [et al]en
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-04T09:08:35Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-04T09:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2018-09-14-
dc.identifier.citationMeta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for body fat distribution in 694,649 individuals of European ancestry. 2018 Hum. Mol. Genet.en
dc.identifier.issn1460-2083-
dc.identifier.pmid30239722-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/hmg/ddy327-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620841-
dc.description.abstractOne in four adults worldwide are either overweight or obese. Epidemiological studies indicate that the location and distribution of excess fat, rather than general adiposity, is most informative for predicting risk of obesity sequellae, including cardiometabolic disease and cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of body fat distribution, measured by waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI), and identified 463 signals in 346 loci. Heritability and variant effects were generally stronger in women than men, and we found approximately one-third of all signals to be sexually dimorphic. The 5% of individuals carrying the most WHRadjBMI-increasing alleles were 1.62 times more likely than the bottom 5% to have a WHR above the thresholds used for metabolic syndrome. These data, made publicly available, will inform the biology of body fat distribution and its relationship with disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Academicen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/hmg/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/hmg/ddy327en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Human molecular geneticsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Oncology. Pathology.::Geneticsen
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Endocrinology::Diabetesen
dc.titleMeta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for body fat distribution in 694,649 individuals of European ancestry.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalHuman molecular geneticsen
dc.type.versionIn press (epub ahead of print)en

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