Empowering junior doctors: a qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620927
Title:
Empowering junior doctors: a qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England
Authors:
Bethune, Rob
Abstract:
Aim: To explore how the South-West Foundation Doctor Quality Improvement programme affected foundation year 1 (F1) doctors’ attitudes and ability to implement change in healthcare. Methods Twenty-two qualitative interviews were carried out with two cohorts of doctors. The first F1 group before and after their participation in the QI programme; the second group comprised those who had completed the programme between 1 and 5 years earlier. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis techniques. Results  Prior to taking part in the QI programme, junior doctors’ attitudes towards QI were mixed. Although there was agreement on the importance of QI in terms of patient safety, not all shared enthusiasm for engaging in QI, while some were sceptical that they could bring about any change. Following participation in the programme, attitudes towards QI and the ability to effect change were significantly transformed. Whether their projects were considered a success or not, all juniors reported that they valued the skills learnt and the overall experience they gained through carrying out QI projects. Participants reported feeling more empowered in their role as junior doctors, with several describing how they felt ‘listened to’ and able to ‘have a voice’, that they were beginning to see things ‘at systems level’ and learning to ‘engage more critically’ in their working environment. Conclusions Junior doctors are ideally placed to engage in QI. Training in QI at the start of their medical careers may enable a new generation of doctors to acquire the skills necessary to improve patient safety and quality of care.
Citation:
Doran N, Bethune R, Watson J, Finucane K, Carson-Stevens A. Empowering junior doctors: a qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England 2018 Postgraduate Medical Journal
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
Postgraduate Medical Journal
Issue Date:
13-Nov-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11287/620927
DOI:
10.1136/postgradmedj-2018-136059
Additional Links:
http://pmj.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/postgradmedj-2018-136059
Note:
This article is freely available via Open Access via the publisher's site.
Type:
Journal Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0032-5473; 1469-0756
Appears in Collections:
Colorectal Surgery; 2018 RD&E publications; Quality Improvement

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBethune, Roben
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T09:16:00Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-20T09:16:00Z-
dc.date.issued2018-11-13-
dc.identifier.citationDoran N, Bethune R, Watson J, Finucane K, Carson-Stevens A. Empowering junior doctors: a qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England 2018 Postgraduate Medical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn0032-5473-
dc.identifier.issn1469-0756-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/postgradmedj-2018-136059-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11287/620927-
dc.description.abstractAim: To explore how the South-West Foundation Doctor Quality Improvement programme affected foundation year 1 (F1) doctors’ attitudes and ability to implement change in healthcare. Methods Twenty-two qualitative interviews were carried out with two cohorts of doctors. The first F1 group before and after their participation in the QI programme; the second group comprised those who had completed the programme between 1 and 5 years earlier. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis techniques. Results  Prior to taking part in the QI programme, junior doctors’ attitudes towards QI were mixed. Although there was agreement on the importance of QI in terms of patient safety, not all shared enthusiasm for engaging in QI, while some were sceptical that they could bring about any change. Following participation in the programme, attitudes towards QI and the ability to effect change were significantly transformed. Whether their projects were considered a success or not, all juniors reported that they valued the skills learnt and the overall experience they gained through carrying out QI projects. Participants reported feeling more empowered in their role as junior doctors, with several describing how they felt ‘listened to’ and able to ‘have a voice’, that they were beginning to see things ‘at systems level’ and learning to ‘engage more critically’ in their working environment. Conclusions Junior doctors are ideally placed to engage in QI. Training in QI at the start of their medical careers may enable a new generation of doctors to acquire the skills necessary to improve patient safety and quality of care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pmj.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/postgradmedj-2018-136059en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Postgraduate Medical Journal. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Patients. Primary care. Medical profession. Forensic medicineen
dc.titleEmpowering junior doctors: a qualitative study of a QI programme in South West Englanden
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalPostgraduate Medical Journalen
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access via the publisher's site.en
dc.type.versionIn press (epub ahead of print)en
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